Acta Scientific Nutritional Health (ASNH)(ISSN: 2582-1423)

Review Article Volume 7 Issue 5

The Facts About High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (HDL-C). I'm Pretty Good Within Limits

Ganesh Bheemanaboina1, Joya Rani Deverashetty2 and Srilatha Bashetti3*

1Tutor, Department of Biochemistry, Dr. PatnamMahender Reddy Institute of Medical Sciences, Chevella, Telangana, India
2Professor and Dean, Department of Physiology, Dr. PatnamMahender Reddy Institute of Medical Sciences, Chevella, Telangana, India
3Associate Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Dr. PatnamMahender Reddy Institute of Medical Sciences, Chevella, Telangana, India

*Corresponding Author: Srilatha Bashetti, Associate Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Dr. PatnamMahender Reddy Institute of Medical Sciences, Chevella, Telangana, India.

Received: March 23, 2023; Published: April 11, 2023

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in the world. High density lipoproteins (HDL) cholesterol is considered as good cholesterol, as it is inversely associated with the atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) through the reverse transport cholesterol system. Lifestyle modifications, novel therapeutic and pharmacological therapy towards raising the levels of HDL-C is still under trials. The short review had explained the positive role of high HDL-C in CVD and non CVD cases, but would also like to emphasize the negative effects of high HDL-C. Many guideline state the prominent role of HDL-C in preventing and reducing the risks of CVD but it is suggestive that one should not assume that high levels of HDL-C is a good prognosis instead clinicians should caution the patients with extremely high HDL-C levels and should be evaluated with at-most care by reducing the possibility of other possible associated risk factors. The present review also shortly highlighted the role of HDL-C levels in various non-cardiovascular diseases helping to understand their pathogenesis. The review states that both diet and drugs can increase the levels of HDL-C but could not support that extremely high HDL would prevent CVD and related mortality. HDL-C is good cholesterol within the limits. Further innovative research studies are recommended to establish the exact cut-off ranges of HDL-C levels based upon the cultures, weather and eating habits of the human population across the world.

Keywords: High Density; Lipoprotein; Cholesterol; HDL-C

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Citation

Citation: Srilatha Bashetti.,et al “The Facts About High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (HDL-C). I'm Pretty Good Within Limits".Acta Scientific Nutritional Health 7.5 (2023): 38-44.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2023 Srilatha Bashetti., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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