Acta Scientific Nutritional Health (ASNH)(ISSN: 2582-1423)

Review Article Volume 6 Issue 8

Impact of Diet and Nutrition on Memory T Cell Development, Maintenance and Function in the Context of Healthy Immune System

Joyeta Ghosh1, Khusboo Singh2, Sudrita Roy Choudhury2*, Samarpita Koner2 and Neelanjana Basu2

1Assistant Professor, Department of Dietetics and Nutrition, NSHM Knowledge Campus-Kolkata, West Bengal India
2Research Scholar, Department of Dietetics and Nutrition, NSHM Knowledge Campus-Kolkata, West Bengal India

*Corresponding Author: Sudrita Roy Choudhury, Research Scholar, Department of Dietetics and Nutrition, NSHM Knowledge Campus-Kolkata, West Bengal India.

Received: July 04, 2022; Published: July 29, 2022

Abstract

A well-functioning immune system is censorious for permanence in today’s earth. The immune system must be persistently alert, keep track of intimation of danger or invasion. Optimum nutrition is always one crucial factor for every cell to function optimally, including cells in the immune system as well. Memory T cells are one rudimentary component of immunological memory, furnishing rapid and powerful host protection against secondary challenges. The diet and nutritional status of the host are two major regulators of T cell functioning and immune system. Present article will review literature considering the crucial impact of diet and nutrition on memory T cell development, maintenance and function in the context of healthy immune function. Caloric restriction without having undernutrition influence memory T cell functioning, while undernutrition or protein energy malnutrition or diet induced obesity predisposes T cell dysfunctionality. On one hand, undernutrition causes immunodeficiency (increased susceptibility to infection), whereas overnutrition/obesity results in inflammation due to increase in pro-inflammatory regulators. Gut dysbiosis also has a significant role in T cell biology and host fitness. In order to maintain a healthy gut microbiome proper dietary intervention are very crucial. Although more detailed research is needed in the current field to unfold the exact role of balanced diet in T cell development, maintenance and function in the context of healthy immune function.

 

Keywords: Diet; T Cells; Immune System; Microbiota; Nutrition

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Citation

Citation: Sudrita Roy Choudhury., et al. “Impact of Diet and Nutrition on Memory T Cell Development, Maintenance and Function in the Context of ealthy Immune System". Acta Scientific Nutritional Health 6.8 (2022): 142-154.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2022 Sudrita Roy Choudhury., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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