Acta Scientific Nutritional Health (ASNH)(ISSN: 2582-1423)

Review Article Volume 6 Issue 3

Bioactivity, Bioavailability and Bioaccessibility of Blackcurrant Anthocyanins: An Updated Comprehensive Review

Ruiting Li1, Chunmin Yang1, Bin Xue1, Xiaodan Hui2, Xin Shao2*and Gang Wu2*

1School of Engineering, Guangzhou College of Technology and Business, Guangzhou, China
2Department of Critical Care Medicine, Maoming People’s Hospital, Maoming, Guangdong, China

*Corresponding Author: Xin Shao and Gang Wu, Department of Critical Care Medicine, Maoming People’s Hospital, Maoming, Guangdong, China.

Received: January 17, 2022; Published: February 10, 2022

Abstract

Blackcurrant-based products are trending worldwide as potential functional foods consumed for diseases prevention. Blackcurrant is recognized as its abundant sources of bioactive compounds and dietary fiber. The phenolic compounds, especially proanthocyanins and anthocyanins existing in blackcurrant berry fruit, have been extensively studied by the scientific community for their various medicinal values. The benefits of the anthocyanins are associated with their free-radical scavenging capacity. Anthocyanins must be available or removed from the blackcurrant matrix and then bioaccessible in the gastrointestinal system and must pass through metabolism to the targeted tissue for this capability in humans or animals. This review was focused on the anthocyanin metabolism from the blackcurrant, including the bioavailability, bioaccessibility, and bioactivity, by summarizing factors affecting phytochemical profiles of blackcurrant-based products, including growing and processing and biokinetics of blackcurrant anthocyanins. Assessment of bioaccessibility and bioavailability of blackcurrant anthocyanin is important for understanding its limitations on absorption and functions of blackcurrant anthocyanin towards human nutrition.

Keywords: Anthocyanin; Bioavailability; Blackcurrant; Phenolic Compounds; Functional Foods

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Citation

Citation: Xin Shao, Gang Wu., et al. “Bioactivity, Bioavailability and Bioaccessibility of Blackcurrant Anthocyanins: An Updated Comprehensive Review". Acta Scientific Nutritional Health 6.3 (2022): 10-34.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2022 Xin Shao, Gang Wu., et al.. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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