Acta Scientific Nutritional Health (ASNH)(ISSN: 2582-1423)

Review Article Volume 6 Issue 2

Brassica Vegetables: Diversity, Nutritional and Health Benefits, and Innovative Markets for Dietary Diversity

João Carlos da Silva Dias*

University of Lisbon - Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal

*Corresponding Author: João Carlos da Silva Dias, University of Lisbon - Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal. E-mail: mirjsd@gmail.com

Received: January 06, 2022; Published: January 27, 2022

Abstract

The genus Brassica comprises six crop species: B. nigra, B. oleracea, B. rapa, B. carinata, B. juncea and B. napus, which provide edible roots, leaves, petioles, stems, inflorescences and seed. All of these six species can be used and consumed as vegetable, although B. nigra is most exclusively cultivated as condiment mustard. Of these species, B. oleracea and B. rapa are highly polymorphic displaying a range of vegetable morphotypes. Brassica vegetable crops are a unique and diverse group. They are highly nutritious and have unique flavor and taste. Brassicas are good sources of dietary fiber, vitamin C, vitamin B6, vitamin K, minerals, and antioxidants glucosinolates and flavonoids, that exhibit anticarcinogen properties. They can accumulate considerable amounts of selenium when grown on high selenium content soils. This article highlights the nutritional and health benefits of vegetable Brassicas, as well as examples of breeding products and attractive product concepts that can stimulate Brassicas consumption and diet diversity.

Keywords: Cruciferae; Nutrition; Phytochemicals; Bioactive Compounds; Glucosinolates; Antioxidants, Diet; Breeding and Selection; New Attractive Products; Consumption

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Citation

Citation: João Carlos da Silva Dias. “Brassica Vegetables: Diversity, Nutritional and Health Benefits, and Innovative Markets for Dietary Diversity". Acta Scientific Nutritional Health 6.2 (2022): 73-88.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2022 João Carlos da Silva Dias. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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