Acta Scientific Nutritional Health (ASNH)(ISSN: 2582-1423)

Research Article Volume 5 Issue 9

Food Consumption Patterns of the Community in the Border Area Sangihe Islands Regency, North Sulawesi Province

Agustinus N Kairupan* , Gabriel H Joseph, Conny N Manoppo, Ratri Retno Ivada, Herlina N Salamba and Anggela T Tombuku

Assessment Institute for Agricultural Technology of North Sulawesi, Manado, Indonesia

*Corresponding Author: Agustinus N Kairupan, Assessment Institute for Agricultural Technology of North Sulawesi, Manado, Indonesia.

Received: July 05, 2021; Published: August 30, 2021

Abstract

  One of the main activities in realizing food security is the achievement of food diversification through improving people's food consumption patterns. The balance of the amount and type of food consumed is important to note because one type of food alone cannot provide optimal nutritional needs. The formation of healthy and quality human resources requires a variety of food consumption to achieve a balance of nutrients according to the standard of adequacy rate. The purpose of this study was to determine the energy/nutrient adequacy rate (AKE/G) and protein adequacy rate (AKP/G) along with the expected food pattern score (PPH) as a parameter of food security and to determine the proportion of energy contribution from each food group to total consumption. energy, especially for people in border areas. The research design used is a cross-sectional study from September to October 2017. The population is community households in border areas with a total of 90 households selected by non-probability sampling purposively. The research data is sourced from secondary and primary data covering socio-economic characteristics, and energy and protein food consumption. Data analysis was carried out quantitatively and qualitatively. The results show that: 1) the average calorie and protein consumption of people in border areas is still within the ideal limit of the adequacy of calorie and protein consumption, which is 2015 kcal and 53.82 grams of protein, and the average consumption of energy and protein is classified as low. normal level deficit category. Consumption of the grain food group contributed energy ranging from 57.80% oil and fat 12.60%, animal food 10.45%, vegetables and fruit (8.41%), and tubers 3.34%). The oily fruit/seed food group and other food groups contributed at least 1.3-1.4% energy.

Keywords:Border Area; Food Consumption Pattern; Energy; Protein

References

  1. Alexandri C., et al. “Subsistence economy and food security – the case of rural households from Romania”. Procedia Economics and Finance 22.1 (2015): 672-680.
  2. Ruel MT. “Operationalizing dietary diversity: a review of measurement issues and research priorities”. Journal of Nutrition 133.11 (2003): 3911-3926.
  3. Rachman HPS and Ariani M. “Diversification of food consumption in Indonesia: problems and implications for policies and programmes”. PPA 6.2 (2008): 140-154.
  4. Joseph GH. “Model of Sustainable Food House Area (MKRPL) North Sulawesi”. Proceedings of the North Sulawesi Agricultural Technology Study Center (2015).
  5. [WNPG] Food and Nutrition Workshop VIII. “Food and nutrition security in the era of regional autonomy and globalization”. Jakarta, 17-19 May (2004).
  6. “Food Consumption Diversification Based on Expected Food Pattern Approach (PPH) in Nutrition Prone Areas”. Nutrition and Family Media. July (2003): 27.
  7. “Quantitative, Qualitative and R&D Research Methods”. Publisher Alfa Beta Bandung (2008).
  8. Central Bureau of Statistics. North Sulawesi in Figures. Central Bureau of Statistics of North Sulawesi (2016).
  9. Hardinsyah A Irawati., et al. “Patterns of Food Consumption and Nutrition of the Indonesian Population”. The Department of Community Nutrition FEMA IPB and the Research and Development Agency of the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Indonesia. Bogor (2012).
  10. Rahardja Pratama and Manurung M. “Macroeconomic Theory. Faculty of Economics University of Indonesia”. Jakarta (2012).
  11. Damanik MR. Ikeu Ekayanti and Educate Hariyadi. “Analysis of the Effect of Mother's Education on the Nutritional Status of Toddlers in West Kalimantan Province”. Journal of Nutrition and Food 5.2 (2010): 69-77.
  12. “Review of Determinants of Food Consumption Diversity”. Journal of Nutrition and Food. Jakarta (2007).
  13. Rose D. “Economic Determinants and Dietary Consequences of Food Insecurity in The United States”. Community and International Nutrition American Society for Nutritional Sceineces (1999).
  14. Tanziha and Herdiana. “Pathway Analysis of Factors Affecting Household Food Security in Kab. Lebak. Banten”. Journal of Food and Nutrition. Jakarta (2009).
  15. Damora AS., et al. “Household Food Consumption Patterns of Forest Farmers Community in West Lampung Regency”. Journal of Food Nutrition 3.3 (2008): 227-232.
  16. Macro Economy. Translated by Fredi Saragih SE. Jakarta. Erlangga (1996).
  17. Torlesse H., et al. “Association of household rice expenditure with child nutritional status indicates a role for macroeconomic food policy in combating malnutrition”. Journal of Nutrition 133.5 (2003): 1320-1325.
  18. Matz JA., et al. “The short term impact of price shocks on food security – evidence from urban and rural Ethiopia”. Food Security 7.3 (2015): 657-679.
  19. Manesa J., et al. “Household Food Security in Damar-Producing Villagesn West Lampung Regency”. Journal of Nutrition and Food 3.3 (2008): 172-179.
  20. Thiele S and Weiss C. “Consumer demand for food diversity: evidence for Germany”. Food Policy 28.2 (2003): 99-115.
  21. Ogundari K. “Determinants of food-poverty states and the demand for dietary diversity in Nigeria”. Paper No. 161302. 2013 AAAE Fourth International Conference; 2013 Sep 22-25; Hammamet, Tunisia. Tunisia (MA): African Association of Agricultural Economists (2013).
  22. Taruvinga A., et al. “Determinants of rural household dietary diversity: the case of Amatole and Nyandeni Districts, South Africa”. International Journal of Sustainable Development 2.4 (2013): 1-15.
  23. Anwar K and Hardinsyah. “Food Consumption and Nutrition and Expected Food Pattern Score (PPH) at the age of 19-49 years in Indonesia”. Journal of Nutrition and Food. Jakarta (2014).
  24. Den Hartog AP., et al. “Manual for Social Surveys on Food Habits and Consumption in Developing Countries”. Margraph Verlag, Weikersheim (1995).
  25. Prasetyo TJ., et al. “Food Consumption and Nutrition and Expected Food Pattern (PPH) scores for children aged 2-6 years in Indonesia”. Journal of Nutrition and Food. Jakarta (2013).
  26. Pertiwi K., et al. “Food Consumption and Nutrition and Expected Food Patterns (PPH) scores for school-aged children 7-12 years in Indonesia”. Journal of Nutrition and Food. Jakarta (2014): 24-31.
  27. Hardinsyah Briawan D., et al. “Analysis of Food Consumption Needs. Center for Food Policy and Nutrition Studies of IPB and Center for Food Consumption Development”. BIMAS Agency for Food Security. Bogor (2002).
  28. “Programs and Activities of the 2013 Food Security Agency Supporting Food Consumption Diversification Activities”. Presented at the Agricultural Development Planning Consultative Meeting (Musrembangtan 2012). Jakarta 23 May (2012).
  29. “Programs and Activities of the 2013 Food Security Agency Supporting Food Consumption Diversification Activities”. Presented at the Agricultural Development Planning Deliberation Event (Musrembangtan 2012). Jakarta 23 May (2012).
  30. Suryana A. “Food Security in Indonesia in Food Security and Nutrition in the Era Regional Autonomy and Globalization”. WNPG. LIPI. Jakarta (2004): 39-51.

Citation

Citation: Agustinus N Kairupan., et al. “Food Consumption Patterns of the Community in the Border Area Sangihe Islands Regency, North Sulawesi Province".Acta Scientific Nutritional Health 5.9 (2021): 71-77.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2021 Agustinus N Kairupan., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




Metrics

Acceptance rate30%
Acceptance to publication20-30 days
Impact Factor1.034

Indexed In





News and Events


  • Certification for Review
    Acta Scientific certifies the Editors/reviewers for their review done towards the assigned articles of the respective journals.
  • Submission Timeline for Upcoming Issue
    The last date for submission of articles for regular Issues is December 15, 2021.
  • Publication Certificate
    Authors will be issued a "Publication Certificate" as a mark of appreciation for publishing their work.
  • Best Article of the Issue
    The Editors will elect one Best Article after each issue release. The authors of this article will be provided with a certificate of “Best Article of the Issue”.
  • Welcoming Article Submission
    Acta Scientific delightfully welcomes active researchers for submission of articles towards the upcoming issue of respective journals.
  • Contact US