Acta Scientific Nutritional Health (ASNH)(ISSN: 2582-1423)

Research Article Volume 4 Issue 4

Food Sources of Energy and Nutrients of Public Health Concern and to Limit and the Contribution of Mixed Dishes to the Diets of Adults 19+ Years of Age: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011 - 2014

Carol E O’Neil1, Theresa A Nicklas2* and Victor L Fulgoni III3

1School of Nutrition and Food Science (Emeritus), Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, U.S.A
2USDA/ARS/CNRC, Baylor College of Medicine, U.S.A
3Nutrition Impact, LLC, U.S.A

*Corresponding Author: Theresa A Nicklas, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas, U.S.A.

Received: February 27, 2020; Published: March 11, 2020

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  The aim of this study was to determine the food sources of energy, nutrients of public health concern and nutrients to limit using two approaches focusing on dairy foods. Twenty-four hour dietary recalls from adults 19 - 50 (n = 5,431) and 51+ years (n = 4,522) participating in NHANES 2011 - 2014 were analyzed. Energy and nutrients were sample-weighted and ranked on percentage contribution to the diet using specific food group intake (SFG) and disaggregated data (DD) for dairy foods. In those 19 - 50 years, cheese and milk were the top ranked food sources of calcium in the SFG and DD; for potassium, vegetables, excluding potatoes, and coffee and tea were top ranked in SFG data and milk and vegetables, excluding potatoes, were top ranked in the DD; for vitamin D, milk and seafood were the top ranked food sources in both analyses. For SFA, mixed dishes—Mexican and sweet bakery products were top ranked using SFG, and cheese and sweet bakery products were top ranked using DD. For those 51 - 99 years for calcium, milk and cheese were the top ranked food sources in both analyses; for potassium, coffee and tea and vegetables, excluding potatoes were the top two food sources for both analyses; for vitamin D, milk and seafood were top ranked. For SFA, fats and oils and sweet bakery products and cheese and fats/oils were top ranked using SFG and DD, respectively. For SFA, mixed dishes—fats/oils and sweet bakery products were top ranked for SFG analysis; cheese and fats/oils were top ranked for the DD. For sodium, bread, rolls, and tortillas and cured meats/poultry were also top ranked for both analyses. Identification of food sources of these important nutrients can help health professionals implement appropriate dietary recommendations and plan age-appropriate interventions to improve diet and health.

Keywords: NHANES; Nutrients; Nutrients of Public Health Concern; Nutrients to Limit; Adults; Food Sources; Dairy Foods

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Citation

Citation: Theresa A Nicklas.,et al. “Food Sources of Energy and Nutrients of Public Health Concern and to Limit and the Contribution of Mixed Dishes to the Diets of Adults 19+ Years of Age: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011 - 2014". Acta Scientific Nutritional Health 4.4 (2020): 28-49.




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Acceptance rate30%
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Impact Factor1.034

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