Acta Scientific Ophthalmology (ISSN: 2582-3191)

Research Article Volume 4 Issue 12

Etiological Factors and Management of Low Vision in a Tertiary Health Institution in Niger-Delta, Nigeria - A 5-Year Review

Onua AA1 and Pepple GF2*

1Department of Ophthalmology, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria
2Department of Surgery, Rivers State University, Nigeria

*Corresponding Author: Pepple GF, Department of Surgery, Rivers State University, Nigeria.

Received: October 26, 2021 ; Published: November 09, 2021

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the causes and management of low vision presenting at the department of Ophthalmology, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital (UPTH), Niger-Delta, Nigeria from 20014 to 2018.

Methodology: A retrospective review of clinical records from the low vision clinic of UPTH from 2014 till 2018. Data extraction: Data on low vision pathologies including the demographics of patients seen from 2014 to 2018 were obtained from the low vision clinic register and entered into Microsoft Excel sheet. Data analysis: Data from Microsoft Excel sheet were exported to Statistical Package for Social Sciences version (SPSS) version 25 for statistical analysis. Relevant data were presented in tables and charts. Statistical significance was performed using Chi square and statistical significance was set at p≤0.05.

Results: A total of 108 patients with various low vision problems were seen during a 5-year period at the Low Vision Clinic of the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital spanning from 2014 to 2018. The commonest causes of low vision were Glaucoma (35.2%), Oculocutaneous Albinism (18%) and Degenerative Myopia (8%). The Mean age of the patients was 41.4 ± 22.5; with a range of 2 to 81 years. Male to Female ratio was 1:1.8.

Conclusion: Glaucoma, Oculocutaneous Albinism and Degenerative Myopia were the predominant causes of low vision. Telescopes and spectacle magnifiers were the most commonly prescribed devices used to ameliorate their vision impairment.

Keywords: Etiology; Low Vision; Niger-Delta

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Citation

Citation: Onua AA and Pepple GF. “Etiological Factors and Management of Low Vision in a Tertiary Health Institution in Niger-Delta, Nigeria - A 5-Year Review".Acta Scientific Ophthalmology 4.12 (2021): 12-17.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2021 Onua AA and Pepple GF. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




Metrics

Acceptance rate35%
Acceptance to publication20-30 days
ISI- IF1.042
JCR- IF0.24

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