Acta Scientific Medical Sciences (ASMS)(ISSN: 2582-0931)

Review Article Volume 8 Issue 6

Update on Noninvasive Management of Ventilatory Pump Failure

Julia Dorta-Díez de la Lastra1*, Antonio Huerta-Armijo2 and John R Bach3

1Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitario del Henares, Madrid, España, Grupo Iberoamericano De Cuidados Respiratorios En Enfermedades Neuromusculares (GICREN), Spain
2Unidad de Hospitalización Domiciliaria NANEAS, Hospital Clínico San Borja Arriarán, Santiago, Chile, Grupo Iberoamericano de Cuidados Respiratorios En Enfermedades Neuromusculares (GICREN), Chile
3Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Professor of Neurology, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rutgers University – New Jersey Medical School, Medical Director of the Center for Ventilator Management Alternatives, University Hospital of Newark, New Jersey, USA

*Corresponding Author: Julia Dorta-Díez de la Lastra, Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitario del Henares, Madrid, España, Grupo Iberoamericano De Cuidados Respiratorios En Enfermedades Neuromusculares (GICREN), Spain.

Received: April 23, 2024; Published: May 28, 2024

Abstract

This is an update on the noninvasive respiratory management of ventilatory pump failure to prevent CO2 narcosis, coma, resort to invasive airway tubes, and respiratory causes of morbidity and mortality. Ventilatory support is provided via noninvasive interfaces (NVS) and airways cleared by mechanical in-exsufflation (MIE) via noninvasive interfaces and airway tubes when present. Many patients became up to continuously dependent on noninvasive intermittent positive pressure ventilatory support (CNVS) for 30 years without developing acute respiratory failure or even being hospitalized in many cases. The CNVS users’ lives were sustained without resort to tracheostomy tubes. Ventilator unweanable patients extubated to CNVS and MIE to permit definitive noninvasive management is considered. Infants with spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA1) have become CNVS dependent by 3 months of age and are now 20 to 30 years old without tracheostomy tubes despite having 0 ml of vital capacity. A 99% successful extubation rate, including 85% rate per attempt, is reported for unweanable infants with SMA1. Successful extubation has also been reported of 254 of 257 patients unable to pass any ventilator weaning parameters or spontaneous breathing trials. Only two patients with severe upper MND, and one with spinal cord injury and cardiovascular instability, underwent tracheostomies. Thirteen patients in essentially chronic vegetative states were weaned from ventilatory support by using MIE via tracheostomy tubes with no supplemental oxygen and over half were decannulated. Thus, noninvasive interventions, including dependence on up to CNVS and MIE, are alternatives to tracheostomy tubes for patients with ventilatory pump failure.

 Keywords: Mechanical Insufflation Exsufflation (MIE); Ventilatory Pump

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Citation

Citation: Julia Dorta-Díez de la Lastra., et al. “Update on Noninvasive Management of Ventilatory Pump Failure”.Acta Scientific Medical Sciences 8.5 (2024): 123-132.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2024 Julia Dorta-Díez de la Lastra., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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