Acta Scientific Medical Sciences (ASMS)(ISSN: 2582-0931)

Research Article Volume 7 Issue 4

Comparison of Physical Performance and Physiological Responses Between Square-Wave Endurance Exercise Test Training and the Repeated Sprint Exercise Training in Young Soccer Players

Zouhaier Farhani1,2*, Ghouili Hatem1, Najemeddine Ouerghui1 and Anissa Bouassida1

1Sport Sciences, Health and Movement (3SM) University of Jendouba, High Institute of Sport and Physical Education of Kef, Tunisia
2Higher Institute of Sport and Physical Education of Ksar Said, Manouba University, Tunis, Tunisia

*Corresponding Author: Zouhaier Farhani, Sport Sciences, Health and Movement (3SM) University of Jendouba, High Institute of Sport and Physical Education of Kef, Tunisia.

Received: January 31, 2022; Published: March 17, 2023

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was tocompare the effect of repeated sprint training on field (RSF) and Square-Wave Endurance Exercise Test (SWEET) on velocity performances, repeated sprint performances on field, repeated sprint on cycle ergometer and anaerobic and aerobic parameters in soccer players.

Subjects and methods: twenty two young male soccer players (age 19.9 ± 1.4 years; body mass: 71.3 ± 7.6 kg; height: 1.80 ± 0.06 m) participated in the study. After the baseline test, soccer players were assigned to either a repeated sprint training group on field [RSF, (3 x 6 x (20+20m), with 4 min series and 30 s of passive recovery between series and repetitions respectively; n = 11] or Square Wave Endurance Exercise Test group (SWEET, 1 min at 90% VO2 peak, 4 min at 50% VO2 peak during 30 min; n = 11) on field in addition to their traditional soccer training. The following parameters were measured before and after seven weeks of training (with 2 sessions per week): 10, 20, and 30 m linear sprints, blood lactate, repeated sprint performances (peak time, total time and fatigue index), the 5-jump performance, repeated sprint on cycle ergometer and peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) on treadmill (Cosmed 170, Fridolfing, Germany).

Results: The test of normality showed that our two groups were homogenous and presented no significant baseline differences for any of the variables studied. The 2-way ANOVA showed significant group x time interaction for sprint times (10, 20 and 30 m, p < 0.001). Sprint linear improvements were higher after RSF than SWEET training (p < 0.01). In the same context, RSF training showed larger improvements in the 5-jump test scores and in repeated sprint test (total time, best time performance, and fatigue index). Peak power output and pedaling speed (rpm) improved significantly during the three sets in the RSF training than SWEET training (p < 0.01). Delta blood lactate concentration was reduced after training. The reduction was more pronounced in SWEET group. Significant group x time interaction was found for VO2peak measured on treadmill (p <0.001), with SWEET showing larger improvement (4.9 ± 1.3%) than RSF group (4.3 ± 1.5%). Blood lactate decreased in both groups (p < 0.05).

Conclusion: Our data shows that a specific training program based on ¶RSF seems more effective than SWEET program in improvements of anaerobic performances in young soccer players. Enhancements of the aerobic fitness were quiet similar in both groups.

Keywords: Repeated Sprint Training; Peak Power Output; Square-Wave Test; Soccer; Velocity

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Citation

Citation: Zouhaier Farhani., et al. “Comparison of Physical Performance and Physiological Responses Between Square-Wave Endurance Exercise Test Training and the Repeated Sprint Exercise Training in Young Soccer Players”.Acta Scientific Medical Sciences 7.4 (2023): 127-136.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2022 Zouhaier Farhani., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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