Acta Scientific Medical Sciences (ASMS)(ISSN: 2582-0931)

Research Article Volume 7 Issue 3

Co-enzyme Q-10 and its Effect on Periodontal Disease and Oral Cancer: A Systematic Review Article

Faraed Dawood Salman1*, Aya Jabbar Hussein2 and Jabbar Hussein Kamel3

1Professor in Department in Dental Assistant, Medical Technical Institute, Erbil Polytechnic University, Erbil/Iraq
2B.Sc. Pharmacy (Iraq), M.Sc. Cosmetic Science Postgraduate Student (USA/OH), M.B.A Student (USA/LA)
3Professor in Conservative Dentistry, Head of Conservative Department, Tishik University, Erbil/Iraq

*Corresponding Author: Faraed Dawood Salman, Professor in Department in Dental Assistant, Medical Technical Institute, Erbil Polytechnic University, Erbil/Iraq.

Received: January 30, 2023; Published: February 14, 2023

Abstract

Background: To combat the excess production of free radicals in periodontal disease, antioxidant medications are employed. Free radicals (FRs) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the major contaminants that Co-Q10 primarily effectively removes in order to perform its intercellular antioxidant function, this study is aimed to:

  1. Analyze the results of using perio Q gel (coenzyme Q10) intravenously only.
  2. As an additional step in the treatment of patients with chronic periodontitis in conjunction to scaling and root planning on the periodontal clinical criteria.
  3. Examine which of the various treatment modalities improved clinical periodontal markers more at 3 and 6 weeks.

Materials and Methods: Clinical periodontal markers like the Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI), Bleeding on Probing (BOP), Probing Pocket Depth (PPD), and Relative Attachment Level (RAL) were evaluated at the first visit, 3 weeks, and 6 weeks.

Results: When compared to the SRP group, the clinical parameters PPD and RAL of the combination group significantly decreased, according to intergroup analysis.

In all groups, the reduction in PI, GI, BOP, PPD, and RAL across the three visits was highly significant when intra-group analysis was performed.

Conclusion: By using the gel in addition to scaling and root planning rather than only scaling and root planning alone, the clinical periodontal parameters improved more significantly.

The ability to employ the gel as the only substance to support common periodontitis treatment methods. In the periodontal treatment phase, the clinical metrics considerably improved, showing that CoQ10 expands treatment possibilities by enhancing the host response to disease activity.

All living things possess the lipid-soluble endogenous antioxidant coenzyme Q10. Coenzyme Q10 may be a therapy for periodontitis, according to the pharmacology of the substance. To establish its precise function in the treatment of periodontitis, including both as an adjuvant and a primary therapeutic agent, as well as the right dosage, efficacy, and bioavailability, more research is required.

Keywords: Co-enzyme Q10; PPD; BOP; SRP; RAL

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Citation

Citation: Faraed Dawood Salman., et al. “Co-enzyme Q-10 and its Effect on Periodontal Disease and Oral Cancer: A Systematic Review Article”.Acta Scientific Medical Sciences 7.3 (2023): 92-103.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2022 Faraed Dawood Salman., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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