Acta Scientific Medical Sciences (ASMS)(ISSN: 2582-0931)

Review Article Volume 5 Issue 10

Genetics Of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases: A Mare’s Nest

Mrinal Ranjan Srivastava1, Anu Chandra2, Farzana Mahdi2, Sharique Ahmad3, Sarita Choudhary4* and Makardhwaj Prasad5

1Assistant Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Phulo Jhano Medical College, Dumka, Jharkhand, India

2Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Era's Lucknow Medical College and Hospital, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India

3Professor, Department of Pathology, Era's Lucknow Medical College and Hospital, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India

4Tutor, Department of Anatomy, Saheed Nirmal Mahto Medical College and Hospital, Dhanbad, India

5Department of Anatomy, Saheed Nirmal Mahto Medical College and Hospital, Dhanbad, India

*Corresponding Author: Sarita Choudhary, Tutor, Department of Anatomy, Patliputra Medical College and Hospitals, Dhanbad, India.

Received: March 30, 2021; Published: October 05, 2021;

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Abstract

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality across the globe. According to World Health Organization estimates, 65 million people have moderate to severe COPD. It has been responsible for changing the diseases spectrum spanning continents. Epidemiological data suggest genetics to be one of those factors, as COPD is known to aggregate in families with a stronger correlation between parents and children or siblings than between spouses. Twin and segregation studies provide evidence that genetic predisposition plays a role in COPD and had indicated that the genetic background of COPD is composed of several genes with small effects, rather than a single major gene.

Keywords: COPD; ADBR2 gene; MMP; MBL2 Gene; NAC

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Citation

Citation: Sarita Choudhary., et al. “Genetics Of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases: A Mare’s Nest”.Acta Scientific Medical Sciences 5.10 (2021): 09-16 .




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