Acta Scientific Medical Sciences (ASMS)(ISSN: 2582-0931)

Research Article Volume 4 Issue 11

The Effectiveness of Combined Mental Practice and Conventional Physiotherapy for the Improvement of Upper Extremity Function and Activity of Daily Performance in Post-stroke Hemiplegic Patients: A Comparative Study

Basil Kum Meh1,2, Maurice Douryang1,3,4*, Franklin Buh Chu1,5, Alain Marsanaud Tedah1, Emmanuel Sako Haddison6, Faustin Atemkeng Tsatedem1 and Joseph Fondop7

1Department of Physiotherapy and Physical Medicine, University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon
2Department of Allied Health, Biaka University Institute of Buea, Buea, Cameroon
3Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Unit, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
4Department of Biomedical Sciences, Evangelical University of Cameroon, Cameroon
5Department of Physiotherapy, St. Louis University, Douala, Cameroon
6Department of General Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon
7Department of Morphological Sciences, Pathological Anatomy and Forensic Medicine, University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon

*Corresponding Author: Maurice Douryang, Department of Physiotherapy and Physical Medicine, University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon and Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Unit, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.

Received: September 15, 2020; Published: October 07, 2020

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Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of Conventional Physiotherapy (CP) alone versus Conventional Physiotherapy (CP) associated to Mental Practice (MP) on post-stroke hemiplegic patients.

Methods: An experimental study was undertaken on 20 post-stroke hemiplegic patients (sub-acute and chronic). Participants were allocated into two groups using consecutive sampling: the experimental group (11) received MP+CP while the control group (09) received CP alone. The experimental group received 20 minutes of MP+CP 3 times a week for 5 weeks. The control group received CP alone. The Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) and the Frenchay Activity Index (FAI) was used to evaluate UE functions and ADP, respectively by a blinded rater.

Results: In the Experimental group: the mean scores for the WMFT and FAI before treatment were 40.0 and 38.5, 28.4 and 24.5 for the sub-acute and chronic patients respectively; after intervention, they were respectively; 56.3 and 36.4, 33.2 and 26.5. While in the Control group: before treatment, they were respectively; 28.9 and 33.0, 22.4 and 28.4. After treatment, we had; 41.5 and 27.5, 25.3 and 26.0.

Conclusion: MP+CP was found to improve post-stroke hemiplegic patient’s UE function and ADP after five weeks of treatment.

Keywords: Mental Practice; Conventional Physiotherapy; Upper Extremity; Post-stroke Hemiplegic Patients

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References

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Citation

Citation: Meh BK Douryang M Chu BF., et al. “The Effectiveness of Combined Mental Practice and Conventional Physiotherapy for the Improvement of Upper Extremity Function and Activity of Daily Performance in Post-stroke Hemiplegic Patients: A Comparative Study". Acta Scientific Medical Sciences 4.11 (2020): 03-12.




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