Acta Scientific Agriculture

Research ArticleVolume 2 Issue 8

Genotypic and Morphological Appearance of the Traits in Relation to Genetic Diversity of Essential Oil Yield in Vetiver Grass (Chrysopogon zizanioides Roberty)

RK Lal1*, CS Chanotiya2 , SS Dhawan3, Pankhuri Gupta3 and S Sarkar1

1Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, CSIR-Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants PO CIMAP, Lucknow, UP, India
2Department of Analytical Chemistry, CSIR-Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants PO CIMAP, Lucknow, UP, India
3Department of Bio-technology, CSIR-Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants PO CIMAP, Lucknow, UP, India

*Corresponding Author: RK Lal, Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, CSIR-Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants PO CIMAP, Lucknow, UP, India.

Received: June 21, 2018; Published: July 12, 2018

Citation: RK Lal., et al. “Genotypic and Morphological Appearance of the Traits in Relation to Genetic Diversity of Essential Oil Yield in Vetiver Grass (Chrysopogon zizanioides Roberty)". Acta Scientific Agriculture 2.8 (2018).

Abstract

  The nature and magnitude of genetic divergence were estimated in 60 vetiver (Chrysopogon zizanioides) genotypes using Mahalanobis D2-statistics by considering four most economic traits. Mahalanobis D2 analysis revealed considerable amount of diversity in the vetiver. The genotypes were grouped into six clusters. Cluster I constituted maximum number of genotypes (36) followed by cluster II (14); III (6), IV (2) and one each in the cluster V and VI, respectively. The genotypes falling under cluster VI had the maximum divergence (163.20), followed by cluster III (118.13) and cluster II (67.52). The highest inter-cluster distances were observed between cluster III and VI (372.10) cluster II and cluster VI (235.77) and Cluster I and VI (207.35), suggesting that the genotypes constituted in these clusters may be used for future breeding programme. Traits like essential oil yield, root yield and oil content was the major contributors to genetic divergence. Accessions No. 20 (DH-1) followed by No. 12 (CIM Samriddhi, No. 32 (Selection -1), No. 36 (Gulabi) and No. 60 (CIM Vriddhi) can be exploited for commercial cultivation.

Keywords: Clusters; Diversity; Distillation; Genetic Variability; Heritability; Vetiver Grass

Copyright: © 2018 RK Lal., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.



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