Acta Scientific Pharmaceutical Sciences (ASPS)(ISSN: 2581-5423)

Review Article Volume 7 Issue 5

A Review on Common Staphylococcal Bacterial Skin Infections in Pediatrics and their Management

Nandini Thummanapally1, Kavitha Lawdyavath1, Charandas Guruva1, Deepthi Enumula1* and PVK Sastry2

1Department of Pharmacy Practice, Balaji Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Narsampet, Warangal, Telangana, India
2P.V.K Sastry Children’s Clinic, Ex-Professor KMC, MGM Hospital, Department of Pediatric Specialist, Kakatiya Medical College, Warangal, Telangana, India

*Corresponding Author: Deepthi Enumula, Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Balaji Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Narsampet, Warangal, Telangana, India.

Received: March 10, 2020; Published: April 26, 2023

Abstract

The skin provides a remarkably good barrier against bacterial infections. Although many bacteria meet or reside on the skin, they are normally unable to establish an infection. When bacterial skin infections do occur, they can range in size from a tiny spot to the entire body surface. They can range in seriousness as well, from harmless to life threatening. Bacterial skin infections are usually caused by gram-positive strains of Staphylococcus and Streptococcus or other organisms. Staphylococcus (sometimes called "staph") is a group of bacteria that can cause a multitude of diseases. Staphylococcus infections may cause disease due to direct infection or due to the production of toxins by the bacteria. Boils, impetigo, food poisoning, cellulitis, and toxic shock syndrome are some of the examples that can be caused by Staphylococcus.

 Keywords: Infection; Staphylococcus; Treatment; Skin

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Citation

Citation: Deepthi Enumula., et al. “A Review on Common Staphylococcal Bacterial Skin Infections in Pediatrics and their Management". Acta Scientific Pharmaceutical Sciences 7.5 (2023): 23-32.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2023 Deepthi Enumula., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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