Acta Scientific Pharmaceutical Sciences (ASPS)(ISSN: 2581-5423)

Research Article Volume 5 Issue 7

SGLT-2 Inhibitors: Drug Selection by Means of the System of Objectified Judgement Analysis Method

Robert Janknegt1*, Mark Reinders1 and Rutger Bianchi2

1Hospital Pharmacist, Zuyderland Medical Centre, The Netherlands
2Internist, Endocrinologist, Zuyderland Medical Centre, The Netherlands

*Corresponding Author: Robert Janknegt, Hospital Pharmacist, Zuyderland Medical Centre, The Netherlands.

Received: February 26, 2021; Published:

Abstract

Objectives: The increasing number of antidiabetic drugs makes it almost impossible to have sufficient knowledge of each individual medicine and device, especially for general practitioners.

Reducing the number of different antidiabetics based on rational criteria, allows physicians and pharmacists to build experience with a more limited set of medicines and to optimise patient information.

Methods: In this study SGLTs are compared by means of the SOJA method.

The following selection criteria were applied: ease of use, available dosage forms, clinical efficacy, documented effects on clinical endpoints, safety, tolerability, drug interactions and documentation.

Results: Some differences in scores were found between canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, empagliflozin and ertugliflozin. Ertugliflozin showed the lowest score, mostly because of its more limited clinical evidence and documentation. Empagliflozin and dapagliflozin showed the highest scores. These medicines are well documented concerning clinical endpoints, including heart failure and safety.

Acquisition cost was not taken into account, because this varies with time. In practice acquisition cost is of course an important selection criterion, especially because there are no major differences between the medicines from a clinical perspective. Exclusion of this criterion also makes this comparison more internationally applicable.

Conclusions: Empagliflozin and dapagliflozin showed the highest scores, mainly because of their documented effects on clinically relevant endpoints and safety.

Keywords: Dapagliflozin; Empagliflozin; SOJA Method

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Citation

Citation: Robert Janknegt., et al. “SGLT-2 Inhibitors: Drug Selection by Means of the System of Objectified Judgement Analysis Method". Acta Scientific Pharmaceutical Sciences 5.7 (2020): 91-112.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2020 Robert Janknegt., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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