Acta Scientific Paediatrics (ASPE)

Research Article Volume 7 Issue 6

Pyloric Muscle Measurements and Serum Electrolyte Correlations in Infants with Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis: Clinical Insights from a Single-Center Study in Saudi Arabia

Tuqa Alsinan1*, Razan Alnujaidi2, Abdullah A Al Qurashi3, Sarah W Alkhonizy4, Nawra Alsinan4, Noureen Almasoud4, Mariyah Aljamea5, Ahmed Abdulaziz Alqerafi6 and Abdulwahab AlJubab7

1Pediatric Surgery Resident, College of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Alfaisal University, Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
2Pediatric Surgery Resident, Pediatric Surgery Department, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
3College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences at the National Guards, King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
4College of Medicine, Alfaisal University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
5College of Medicine, King Faisal University, Alhafouf, Saudi Arabia
6King Saud bin Abdulaziz for Health Sciences, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
7Consultant, Pediatric Surgeon, Chairman, Pediatric Surgery Department, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

*Corresponding Author: Tuqa Alsinan, Pediatric Surgery Resident, College of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Alfaisal University, Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Received: May 10, 2024; Published: May 24, 2024

Abstract

Background: HPS is a common obstruction in infants, necessitating an in-depth analysis of demographic profiles and surgical outcomes for effective management. This study aimed to investigate the clinical insights of pyloric muscle measurements and serum electrolytes during the practice within a tertiary hospital setting, utilizing a convenient sample size for analysis.

Results: Infants predominantly male with HPS presented with an average weight of 3.487 ± 0.886 kg and experienced an average hospital stay of 47.87 ± 74.18 days. Following pyloric muscle correction, 40% of infants gradually resumed feeding, while 40% immediately accepted oral intake. Significant correlations were observed between pyloric muscle dimensions, presentation weight, and duration from birth to admission. Serum Na and K levels exhibited positive correlations, while serum Cl displayed a negative association with the duration from birth to admission.

Conclusion: This study offers detailed insights into the demographic characteristics, clinical presentation, and surgical outcomes of infants with HPS undergoing pyloromyotomy. These findings contribute to a better understanding of HPS management in infants, warranting further investigation through larger-scale studies for validation.

Keywords: Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis; Pyloromyotomy; Pyloric Muscle Measurement; Serum Electrolyte; Single-Center; Pediatric Surgery

References

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    Citation

    Citation: Tuqa Alsinan., et al. “Pyloric Muscle Measurements and Serum Electrolyte Correlations in Infants with Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis: Clinical Insights from a Single-Center Study in Saudi Arabia".Acta Scientific Paediatrics 7.6 (2024): 03-08.

    Copyright

    Copyright: © 2024 Tuqa Alsinan., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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