Acta Scientific Paediatrics (ISSN: 2581-883X)

Research Article Volume 4 Issue 10

Clinicobacteriological Study of Neonatal Septicemia with Special Reference to Sepsis C-Reactive Protein and Procalcitonin

VL Jayasimha1* and Shaswati Dey2

1Professor and HOD Department of Microbiology, SSIMS and RC, Davangere, Karnataka, India
2Junior Resident, Department of Pediatrics SSIMS and RC, Davangere, Karnataka, India

*Corresponding Author: Shaswati Dey, Junior Resident, Department of Pediatrics SSIMS and RC, Davangere, Karnataka, India.

Received: August 24, 2021; Published: September 29, 2021;

Citation: VL Jayasimha and Shaswati Dey. “Clinicobacteriological Study of Neonatal Septicemia with Special Reference to Sepsis C-Reactive Protein and Procalcitonin". Acta Scientific Paediatrics 4.10 (2021): .

Abstract

Background: Neonatal sepsis can be described as an invasive bacterial infection which occurs within a month of life. Neonatal sepsis can present in two forms based on the age of onset, the one within 48hrs of birth is early onset sepsis (EOS) and the other late onset sepsis (LOS) which occurs after 48hrs after the birth. The incidence is 11 - 24.5/1000 live births in India.

Aim of the Study: This study aims at giving an outline of the load of bacterial sepsis in the developing countries in newborn population. The focus will be on the pathogens mostly implicated, their antibiotic susceptibility patterns, and management and finding out the diagnostic performance of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein in the intensive neonatal care unit as a early diagnostic marker.

Methodology: This study was conducted in Department of Microbiology at of S.S. Institute of Medial Science and Research Centre, Davangere. As per the criteria by Vergnano, clinically diagnosed neonates with septicaemia are included in the study. The study group comprised of 145 suspected cases of neonatal septicaemia in the neonatal intensive care unit. Blood culture by automated blood culture system was done along with C Reactive protein estimation by Nephelometry and Procalcitonin by Immunofluorometry.

Results and Discussion: In the present study out of total 145 cases, female were 64 (44%) and males were 81 (55%). In this study clinical feature like seizures and hurried breathing, grunting are seen in most of the neonates with Klebsiella pneumoniae, E. coli and S. aureus as major organisms. In this study out of 145 cases CRP positive cases were 51 (35%) and CRP negative cases were 94 (64%).

In this study out of 62 blood culture positive cases, CRP was positive in 32 cases and out of 83 blood culture negative cases 64 were negative.

In this study, among 62 positive blood cultures 48 cases had positive procalcitonin. We found positive procalcitonin in 36 cases where blood culture was negative. Out of 83 blood culture negative cases 47 had negative procalcitonin. In this study < 0.5 ng/ml PCT was found in 61 (42%), 0.5 - 2 ng/ml was found in 45 (31%), > 2 ng/ml was found in 39 (27%). It has sensitivity of 57.14% and specificity of 77.05%, positive predictive value of 77.4% and negative predictive value of 56.63%.

 

Keywords: Neonatal Septicemia; C-Reactive Protein; Procalcitonin; Early Onset Sepsis (EOS); Late Onset Sepsis (LOS)

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Copyright: © 2021 VL Jayasimha and Shaswati Dey. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.



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