Acta Scientific Orthopaedics (ISSN: 2581-8635)

Research Article Volume 5 Issue 10

Hamstrings Graft Harvesting: Where Should be the Incision? Anatomical Landmarks Based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

Alan Augusto Coelho1, Júlio César Nather Júnior2, Rodrigo Salim1, Mauricio Kfuri Junior3, Robinson Esteves Pires4 and Fabricio Fogagnolo1*

1Department of Orthopaedics and Anaesthesiology, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto (SP), Brazil
2Department of Medical Imaging, Hematology and Clinical Oncology. Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto (SP), Brazil
3Missouri Orthopaedic Institute. University of Missouri, Columbia (MO), United States
4Department of the Locomotor Apparatus. Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (MG), Brazil

*Corresponding Author: Fabricio Fogagnolo, Department of Orthopaedics and Anaesthesiology, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto (SP), Brazil.

Received: August 19, 2022; Published: September 12, 2022

Abstract

Objective: The objective of the present study was to standardize the surgical approach for hamstring graft harvesting, with location of the center of the incision based on anatomical parameters and using data from a selection of magnetic resonance images of the knee.

Method: This study analyzed 40 magnetic resonance images of the knee (20 men and 20 women). The parameters measured were: longitudinal distance from the proximal border of the pes anserinus to the femorotibial joint in the coronal section (PA-JOINT); transverse distance from the lateral border of the pes anserinus to the medial border of the anterior tibial tuberosity in the axial section (PA-ATT); and ratio between the distance from the proximal border of the pes anserinus to the femorotibial joint (PA-JOINT) and the largest transverse width of the tibial plateau (WIDTH PLATEAU).

Results: According to the analysis, the location of the center of the incision was estimated to be 4.0 cm distally to the femorotibial joint (PA-JOINT) and 2.5 cm medially to the anterior tibial tuberosity (PA-ATT). There was a strong intra-observer and regular inter-observer correlation for these measurements.

Conclusion: With the precise determination of the incision center, it is possible to standardize an accurate and reproducible surgical approach for hamstring graft harvesting.

Keywords: Hamstring Graft; Autologous Graft; Surgical Approach; Ligament Reconstruction; Knee Surgery

References

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Citation

Citation: Fabricio Fogagnolo., et al. “Hamstrings Graft Harvesting: Where Should be the Incision? Anatomical Landmarks Based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging".Acta Scientific Orthopaedics 5.10 (2022): 20-26.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2022 Fabricio Fogagnolo., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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