Acta Scientific Orthopaedics (ISSN: 2581-8635)

Research Article Volume 4 Issue 6

Blood Flow Restriction Effects on Amateur Soccer Player: More than Just Strength and Mass Gains?

Besozzi Lorenzo*

Department of Physiotherapy, Ola Grimsby Insitute/Rehability Lugano, Lugano, Swiss, Switzerland

*Corresponding Author: Besozzi Lorenzo, Department of Physiotherapy, Ola Grimsby Insitute/Rehability Lugano, Lugano, Swiss, Switzerland.

Received: May 10, 2021; Published: May 24, 2021

Abstract

Objective: To investigate effects of blood flow restriction (BFR) in pain modulation beyond other well-established effects on muscle gains after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery in a soccer player.

Design: Case study examining BFR training in a clinical rehabilitation setting.

Methods: BFR was utilized in a strength training protocol of the lower limbs after ACL surgery. Pain values on a visual analogue scale (VAS) were collected before and after the strength protocol's execution. The cross-sectional area of the thigh and isometric mean and peak force output during a squat were measured before the protocol execution.

Results: Minimal clinical important difference (MCID) of 20 mm on a 1 - 100 mm VAS was reported in both pre- and post-training values between the first data collection (T0) and the last one (T3). No improvements were reported in CSA values on the injured limb between T0-T3. Inconsistent values were reported in the isometric squat test: an increase of both mean and peak from T0 were reported in T1 and T2. Both values then decreased again in T3, below T0 values.

Conclusion: BFR may play an essential role in pain modulation after ACL surgery.

Keywords: ACL; Pain; Rehabilitation; Soccer

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Citation

Citation: Besozzi Lorenzo. “Blood Flow Restriction Effects on Amateur Soccer Player: More than Just Strength and Mass Gains?".Acta Scientific Orthopaedics 4.6 (2021): 82-89.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2021 Besozzi Lorenzo. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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Impact Factor0.614

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