Acta Scientific Orthopaedics (ASOR) (ISSN: 2581-8635)

Case Report Volume 3 Issue 8

Could the Yeargan Autologous Subchondral Nanoplastytm and Mechanical Axis Deviation Protocol (NAMAD®) Halt Molecular Progression and Reverse the Clinical Symptoms of Knee Osteoarthritis? Clinical and Scientific Concepts with Case Presentation Including T2 Wetmap Cartigram® sequencing

Austin Yeargan III1*, Bailey Montgomery2, Matt Murphy2, Katie Whitney3, Peter Millett3 and Thos Evans3

1The Regenerative Medicine Clinic, Wilmington, North Carolina, USA
2Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
3The Steadman Clinic, 181 West Meadow Drive, Vail, Colorado, USA

*Corresponding Author: Austin Yeargan III, The Regenerative Medicine Clinic, Wilmington, North Carolina, USA.

Received: March 11, 2020; Published: July 30, 2020

×

Abstract

 Osteoarthritis causes a heavy disease burden globally and treatments are continually evolving. We introduced an autologous cell therapy protocol in 2006 that has continued to demonstrate promise clinically and on advanced imaging studies. In this report, we detail applicable scientific concepts, our surgical technique and present a case report for illustration.

Keywords: Osteoarthritis; Subchondral Bone; Nanoplastytm and Mechanical Axis Deviation Protocol (NAMAD®)

×

References

  1. Barr AJ., et al. “A systematic review of the relationship between subchondral bone features, pain and structural pathology in peripheral joint osteoarthritis”. Arthritis Research and Therapy 1 (2015):228.
  2. Li G., et al. “Subchondral bone in osteoarthritis: insight into risk factors and microstructural changes”. Arthritis Research and Therapy 6 (2013): 223.
  3. Jutila AA., et al. “Candidate mediators of chondrocyte mechanotransduction via targeted and untargeted metabolomic measurements”. Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics 545 (2014): 116-123.
  4. Teichtahl AJ., et al. “Wolff's law in action: a mechanism for early knee osteoarthritis”. Arthritis Research and Therapy 1 (2015): 207.
  5. Hardcastle SA., et al. “Individuals with high bone mass have an increased prevalence of radiographic knee osteoarthritis”. Bone 71 (2015): 171-179.
  6. Zignego DL., et al. “Mechanotransduction in primary human osteoarthritic chondrocytes is mediated by metabolism of energy, lipids, and amino acids”. Journal of Biomechanics 16 (2015): 4253-4261.
  7. Fülöp T Jr., et al. “Ageing, autoimmunity and arthritis: Perturbations of TCR signal transduction pathways with ageing - a biochemical paradigm for the ageing immune system”. Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics 6 (2003): 290-302.
  8. Allen KD and Golightly YM. “State of the evidence”. Current Opinion in Rheumatology 3 (2015):276-283.
  9. Osteoarthritis Prevention and Management in Primary Care.
  10. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Austin_Yeargan_Iii2
  11. Pickarski M., et al. “Changes in articular cartilage and subchondral bone in the rat anterior cruciate ligament transection and meniscectomized models of osteoarthritis”. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 12 (2011): 197.
  12. L Wang., et al. “Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell therapy for patients with active rheumatoid arthritis: safety and efficacy”. Stem Cells and Development 22 (2013): 3192-3202.
  13. Vieira Paladino F., et al. “The Immunomodulatory Potential of Wharton's Jelly Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells”. Stem Cells International (2019): 3548917.
  14. Jaalouk DE and Lammerding J. “Mechanotransduction gone awry”. Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 1 (2009): 63-73.
  15. Victoria G., et al. “Bone stimulation for fracture healing: what’s all the fuss?” The Indian Journal of Orthopaedics 2 (2009): 117-120.
  16. Claes L and Willie B. “The enhancement of bone regeneration by ultrasound”. Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 1-3 (2007): 384-398.
  17. Naruse K., et al. “Anabolic response of mouse bone-marrow-derived stromal cell clone ST2 cells to low-intensity pulsed ultrasound”. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 1 (2000): 216-220.
  18. Stewart S., et al. “Mecchanotransduction in osteogenesis”. Bone and Joint Research1 (2020): 1-14.
  19. Azuma Y., et al. “Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound accelerates rat femoral fracture healing by acting on the various cellular reactions in the fracture callus”. The Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 4 (2001): 671-680.
  20. Higgins A., et al. “EXOGEN ultrasound bone healing system for long bone fractures with non-union or delayed healing: a NICE medical technology guidance”. Applied Health Economics and Health Policy 5 (2014): 477-484.
  21. B Nakken., et al. “Biomarkers for rheumatoid arthritis: from molecular processes to diagnostic applications-current concepts and future perspectives”. Immunology Letters 189 (2017): 13-18.
×

Citation

Citation: Austin Yeargan III., et al. “Could the Yeargan Autologous Subchondral Nanoplastytm and Mechanical Axis Deviation Protocol (NAMAD®) Halt Molecular Progression and Reverse the Clinical Symptoms of Knee Osteoarthritis? Clinical and Scientific Concepts with Case Presentation Including T2 Wetmap Cartigram® sequencing". Acta Scientific Orthopaedics 3.8 (2020): 40-50.




Metrics

Acceptance rate33%
Acceptance to publication20-30 days

Indexed In



News and Events


  • Certification for Review
    Acta Scientific certifies the Editors/reviewers for their review done towards the assigned articles of the respective journals.
  • Submission Timeline for Upcoming Issue
    The last date for submission of articles for regular Issues is May 30, 2024.
  • Publication Certificate
    Authors will be issued a "Publication Certificate" as a mark of appreciation for publishing their work.
  • Best Article of the Issue
    The Editors will elect one Best Article after each issue release. The authors of this article will be provided with a certificate of "Best Article of the Issue"
  • Welcoming Article Submission
    Acta Scientific delightfully welcomes active researchers for submission of articles towards the upcoming issue of respective journals.

Contact US