Acta Scientific Medical Sciences (ASMS)(ISSN: 2582-0931)

Research Article Volume 6 Issue 7

Chemerin, IL-18 and IL-1 Beta as Biomarkers of Metabolic Syndrome in Egyptian Obese Children

Suzan S Gad1, Hassan A Shora2*, Amina Abdelwahab1, Rania M Abdou4, Batoul M Abdel Raouf4, Hani A Elmikaty3, Sanaa Nassar1, Ahmed A Ali1, Hussein M Ismail6 and Ismail Dahshan5

1Professor of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Egypt
2Senior Research Scientist, Harvard Medical School Associate, Port-Said University and Ismailia Medical Complex, Egypt
3Researcher of Pediatrics, National Research Centre, Egypt
4Lecturer of Child Psyciatry, Ain Shams university, Egypt
5Lecturer Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Egypt
6Lecturer of Cardiology Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Egypt

*Corresponding Author: Hassan A Shora, Senior Research Scientist, Harvard Medical School Associate, Port-Said University and Ismailia Medical Complex, Egypt.

Received: May 02, 2022; Published: June 08, 2022

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Metabolic syndrome (MetS), one of the most serious global health issues, is considered chronic inflammatory states. Chemerin, Il-18 and Il-1 beta adipocytokines, plays an important role in linking Met S and inflammation. Few studies are conducted in Egypt to disclose the role of chemerin, Il-18 and Il-1 beta as combined biomarkers to increase its diagnostic accuracy. So the aim of our study was to evaluate the role of serum chemerin Il-18 and Il-1 beta as combined biomarkers for early detection of metabolic syndrome due to different genetic and environmental backgrounds.

Methods: The study enrolled 171 participants divided into three groups, 57 children in each group. Group I:, 57 healthy control children group II obese children without metabolic syndrome and obese children with metabolic syndrome in Group 3 and. ranging in age from 5 to 17, were included in the study. Anthropometric and blood pressure measurements were taken of the participants. Fasting blood glucose, serum triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) were measured. ELISA was used to assess the amounts of circulating chemerin.

Results: Met S requirements were satisfied by 57 individuals. Abdominal obesity was the most common Met S predictor (84.2%), followed by impaired fasting blood sugar (73.7%), and then each of high triglyceride and low HDL (68.4%). Serum chemerin levels were significantly higher in Met S than in non-Met S obese and healthy subjects (1211.7 ± 1569 ng/ml VS 337.5 ± 34.8 ng/ml and 470.3 ± 475.8 ng/ml respectively, p ˂ 0.001). Serum chemerin levels were shown to be substantially linked with impaired fasting blood sugar (r = 0.398, p = 0.009) and low HDL (r = -0.386, p = 0.012) by correlation and multiple linear regression analysis.

Conclusion: Circulating chemerin Il-18 and Il-1 beta , levels were associated with metabolic syndrome and could be independent markers for this disorder.

Keywords: Children; Metabolic Syndrome; Chemerin; Il-18; Il-1 Beta; Biomarker; Obesity

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Citation

Citation: Suzan S Gad, Hassan A Shora and Amina Abdelwahab., et al. “Chemerin, IL-18 and IL-1 Beta as Biomarkers of Metabolic Syndrome in Egyptian Obese Children”.Acta Scientific Medical Sciences 6.7 (2022): 66-77.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2022 Hassan A Shora., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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