Acta Scientific Microbiology (ISSN: 2581-3226)

Research Article Volume 4 Issue 12

Ziziphus Treatment has a Protective Effect Against Experimentally Induced Osteoporosis in Female Rats

Omar Abdulrhman Alfaroq1*, Abdulaziz Radhi S ALjohni2, Mohamed Hassan Badawood3, Sherif Mohamed Hassan4, Gamal Said Abdul Aziz4 and Azeza Abdulrhman Alfaroqie5

1Department of Laboratory at King Fahad Hospital, Medina, Saudi Arabia
2Department of Laboratory at King Fahad Hospital, Ph.D. Microbiology, Medina, Saudi Arabia
3Professor and President of Anatomy Department, King Abdulaziz Student, University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
4Associate Professor of Anatomy, King Abdulaziz Student, University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
5Department of Laboratory at King Fahad Hospital, Medina, Saudi Arabia

*Corresponding Author: Omar Abdulrahman Alfaroq, Department of Laboratory at King Fahad Hospital, Saudi Arabia.

Received: September 16, 2021 ; Published: November 10, 2021

Abstract

Many investigations have shown that women's transition to menopause might be correlated with greater bone loss. In the medical community, this process is referred to as osteopenia. To find out if the ZSC leaf extract might prevent osteopenia, we looked at the effect of 100 mg/kg b.wt on the osteopenia of mice. Based on the findings, there was a large rise in insulin, IGF-1, and body weight gain, as well as a significant fall in insulin, IGF-1, and body weight gain. The levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) in the blood rose, but the levels of calcitonin (CT), procollagen type 1 (PC1), and osteocalcin (OC) in the blood dropped. A decrease in bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP), bone mineral density (BMD), and calcium and phosphorus levels in both blood and bone are associated with this. It was discovered that the bone of aging rats had increased levels of oxidative stress markers [xanthine oxidase (XOD), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric oxide (NO), and malondialdehyde (MDA)] as well as decreased levels of antioxidants [glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and total antioxidant capacity] (TAC). ZSC leaf extract has been found to aid in the reduction of body weight loss and the prevention of all bone alterations. As a result, ZSC leaves may be authorized as a natural medicinal agent with a range of advantages for the treatment of menopause and bone loss, among other conditions.

Keywords: King Abdulaziz; University; Jeddah; Ziziphus; Osteoporosis; ZSC Could be Approved as a Natural Therapeutic; Female Rat

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Citation

Citation: Omar Abdulrhman Alfaroq., et al. “Ziziphus Treatment has a Protective Effect Against Experimentally Induced Osteoporosis in Female Rats”. Acta Scientific Microbiology 4.12 (2021): 02-18.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2021 Omar Abdulrhman Alfaroq., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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