Acta Scientific Gastrointestinal Disorders (ASGIS)(ISSN: 2582-1091)

Research Article Volume 5 Issue 11

Comparative Analysis of Risk Factors for the Burden of Oncological Diseases in men in Muslim and Christian Countries with the Same Economic and Geographical Location

Ludmila Radkevich1* and Dariya Radkevich2

1Doctor of Biological Sciences, Chief Researcher, Center for Theoretical Problems of Physicochemical Pharmacology of the Russian Academy of Sciences CTP PCP RAS, 30 Srednya Kalitnikovskaya, Moscow, Russia
2Specialist (Physicist), Analyst, Center for Theoretical Problems of Physicochemical Pharmacology of the Russian Academy of Sciences CTP PCP RAS, 30 Srednya Kalitnikovskaya, Moscow, Russia

*Corresponding Author: Ludmila Radkevich, Doctor of Biological Sciences, Chief Researcher, Center for Theoretical Problems of Physicochemical Pharmacology of the Russian Academy of Sciences CTP PCP RAS, 30 Srednya Kalitnikovskaya, Moscow, Russia.

Received: July 25, 2022; Published: October 21, 2022

Abstract

Objective: To study risk factors for the burden of cancer in Muslim and Christian countries in 2004.

Methods and Results: Mann-Whitney U test. 33 Muslim countries and 33 Christian countries were matched with the same Economic-Geographical position.

The "quality of life" for Muslims and Christians did not have a statistical difference. Muslims had 2 times less than Christians the burden of Esophageal, Melanoma, Breast and Prostate cancer (p ≤ 0.022) and 3 times less than the burden of Alcoholism. But Muslims had a 1.4 times higher burden of Bladder cancer and Lymphoma than Christians (p ≤ 0.023).

The burden of the remaining 8 types of cancer was not statistically significantly different between Muslims and Christians. It was established that Muslims and Christians chose different food products from the same daily set of products in terms of volume and composition (Medians: 1185 and 1064 g/person/day, 45 types). So, Muslims consumed 2 times less Christian Pigmeat, 3 times less Fats Animals, Maize, Beans, Beverages, Alcoholic, Wine, 6 times less Beer.

But Muslims consumed 3-4 times more than Christians Mutton and Goat Meat, Wheat, Nuts, Onions, Vegetables and 1.4 times the total amount of Grains and legumes. For the remaining 30 types of products, the daily consumption of Muslims and Christians did not differ statistically significantly. It has been established that the intake of macronutrients of animal origin (Energy, Proteins and Fats) in 1990 and 2005 for Muslims was 33% lower than for Christians (p ≤ 0.024). At the same time, Total Energy and its percentage composition (Carbohydrates, Proteins and Fats) did not have statistically significant differences between Muslims and Christians in 1990 and 2005.

Conclusions: The results suggest differences in cancer burden risk factors between Muslims and Christians and suggest a continuation of the study.

Keywords: Muslims; Christians; Quality of Life; Metabolic Syndrome; Cancer Risk Factors; Levels of Consumption of Foods; Alcoholic Beverages; Nutrients

References

  1. Rawal LB., et al. “Non-communicable disease (NCD) risk factors and diabetes among adults living in slum areas of Dhaka, Bangladesh”. PLoS One 10 (2017): e0184967.
  2. Kokane AM., et al. “Descriptive profile of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases using WHO STEP wise approach in Madhya Pradesh”. Peer Journal 8 (2020): e9568.
  3. Golan R., et al. “Wine and Health-New Evidence”. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition1 (2019): 55-59.
  4. He X., et al. “Alcohol consumption and incident diabetes: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study”. Diabetologia 5 (2019): 770-778.
  5. Furman D., et al. “Chronic inflammation in the etiology of disease across the life span”. Nature Medicine 12 (2019): 1822-1832.
  6. Scheen AJ. “[Alcohol, protective or risk factor for cardiovascular disease?]”. Revue Medicale de Liege (2019).
  7. Yusuf S., et al. “Modifiable risk factors, cardiovascular disease, and mortality in 155 722 individuals from 21 high-income, middle-income, and low-income countries (PURE): a prospective cohort study”. Lancet 10226 (2020): 795-808.
  8. Roerecke M. “Alcohol's Impact on the Cardiovascular System”. Nutrients10 (2021): 3419.
  9. Minzer S., et al. “The Effect of Alcohol on Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Is There New Information?” Nutrients4 (2020): 912.
  10. Akinosun AS., et al. “Digital Technology Interventions for Risk Factor Modification in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis”. JMIR Mhealth Uhealth3 (2021): e21061.
  11. Rosoff DB., et al. “Evaluating the relationship between alcohol consumption, tobacco use, and cardiovascular disease: A multivariable Mendelian randomization study”. PLOS Medicine 12 (2020): e1003410.
  12. Van Oort S., et al. “Association of Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Lifestyle Behaviors with Hypertension: A Mendelian Randomization Study”. Hypertension6 (2020): 1971-1979.
  13. Elbarsha A., et al. “[Alcohol consumption and risk of cancer]”. Ugeskrift for Laeger 14 (2021): V12200929.
  14. Rumgay H., et al. “Global burden of cancer in 2020 attributable to alcohol consumption: a population-based study”. Lancet Oncology8 (2021): 1071-1080.
  15. Hong S., et al. “Alcohol Consumption and the Risk of Prostate Cancer: A Dose-Response Meta-Analysis”. Nutrients8 (2020): 2188.
  16. Li Y., et al. “Alcohol Consumption and Risk of Gastric Cancer: The Japan Collaborative Cohort Study”. Journal of Epidemiology 1 (2021): 30-36.
  17. Donat-Vargas C., et al. “Trajectories of alcohol consumption during life and the risk of developing breast cancer”. British Journal of Cancer8 (2021): 1168-1176.
  18. Bener A., et al. “Effect of ramadan fasting on glycemic control and other essential variables in diabetic patients”. Annals of African Medicine 4 (2018): 196-202.
  19. Sinaga M., et al. “Metabolic Effects of Fasting and Animal Source Food Avoidance in an Ethiopian Adult Cohort”. Scientific Reports 1 (2019): 16964.
  20. Wolfe BM., et al. “Treatment of obesity: weight loss and bariatric surgery”. Circulation Research (2016).
  21. USD 2008. World Health Organization. The global burden of disease: 2004 update. 2009. United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Population Prospects 2019.
  22. Prosperity Rating.
  23. Rank of corruption (2016).
  24. Rating of peacefulness. Global Peace Index.
  25. Happiness Index HPI 2016 (World Happiness Report 2016). Index of human development.
  26. United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. 2009. World Population Prospects 2008. (World Population Prospects 2008) (2008).
  27. 2005-2010. World Population Prospects United Nations. Access to health care, Clean water and Clean air (2010).
  28. Metabolic syndrome) World Health Organization. 2008. “The global burden of disease 2004 update” (2008).
  29. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. 2017. Food Balance Sheets 2003-05.
  30. NCD Countdown 2030 collaborators. NCD Countdown 2030: worldwide trends in non-communicable disease mortality and progress towards Sustainable Development Goal target 3.4”. Lancet10152 (2018): 1072-1088.
  31. Li X., et al. “Cardiovascular risk factors in China: a nationwide population-based cohort study”. Lancet Public Health 12 (2020): e672-e681.
  32. Idowu A., et al. “Clustering of behavioural risk factors for non-communicable diseases (NCDs) among rural-based adolescents in south-west Nigeria”. International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health 1 (2014).
  33. Di Cesare M., et al. “Inequalities in non-communicable diseases and effective responses. Lancet NCD Action Group”. Lancet9866 (2013): 585-597.
  34. Ekta G and Tulika MG. “Risk factor distribution for cardiovascular diseases among high school boys and girls of urban Dibrugarh, Assam”. Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care 1 (2016): 108-113.
  35. Climate change and food security: risks and responses (FAO, 2015a; Beed et al., Climate change and food security: risks and responses (2015a).
  36. Global Health Estimates. “Disease burden by Cause, Age, Sex, by Country and by region, 2000-2016”. Geneva, World Health Organization (2018).
  37. Spanaki C., et al. “The Christian Orthodox Church Fasting Diet Is Associated with Lower Levels of Depression and Anxiety and a Better Cognitive Performance in Middle Life”. Nutrients2 (2021): 627.
  38. Trepanowski JF., et al. “Impact of caloric and dietary restriction regimens on markers of health and longevity in humans and animals: a summary of available findings”. Nutrition Journal 10 (2021): 107.
  39. Ludmila Alexandrovna Radkevich and Dariya Andreyevna Radkevich. “Comparative Analysis of Risk Factors for Noncommunicable Chronic Diseases with the Use of High Doses of Wine and Strong Alcoholic Beverages”. EC Pharmacology and Toxicology1 (2022): 37-50.
  40. Lyudmila Alexandrovna Radkevich and Dariya Andreyevna Radkevich. “Analysis of the Burden of Cardiovascular Morbidity in Countries with High and Low Levels of Daily Food Consumption”. Online Journal of Cardiology Research and Reports 1 (2021): 2021.
  41. Radkevich LA and Radkevich DA. “Comparative Analysis of Economic, Geographic, Social and Nutritional Risk Factors 4 Types of Non-Communicable Chronic Diseases (Melanoma, Multiple Sclerosis, Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertensive Heart Disease) in the Mediterranean and Caribbean Countries (Population Study)”. Journal of Obesity and Chronic Diseases 2 (2020): 51-58.
  42. Ludmila Radkevich and Dariya Radkevich. “Happy People in the World Live 25 Years Longer Than Unhappy People and are Less Likely to Suffer from Cardio Pathologies”. Online Journal of Cardiology Research Reviews and Reports1 (2017): 2-13.
  43. Ludmila Radkevich and Dariya Radkevich. “Can Alcohol and Obesity be Considered Risk Factors for Diabetes Mellitus? (Environmental study)”. Current Research in Diabetes and Obesity Journal 1 (2021): 555905.
  44. Lyudmila Alexandrovna Radkevich and Dariya Andreyevna Radkevich. “Dietary Patterns and Economic and Geographic Risk Factors for the Burden of Diabetes Mellitus (Observational Study)”. EC Diabetes and Metabolic Research4 (2021): 82-96.
  45. Lyudmila Alexandrovna Radkevich and Daria Andreevna Radkevich. “Analysis of Dietary Patterns and Economic and Geographic Risk Factors for the Burden of Cardiovascular Disease”. Online Journal of Cardiology Research Reviews and Reports 2 (2021): 2-11.
  46. Ludmila Alexandrovna Radkevich and Dariya Andreyevna Radkevich. “Analysis of the Burden of Cardiovascular Diseases, Prostate and Breast Cancer and Alcoholism in Countries with High and Low Daily Alcohol Consumption”. EC Pharmacology and Toxicology10 (2021): 12-25.
  47. Roerecke M and Rehm J. “Alcohol consumption, drinking patterns, and ischemic heart disease: a narrative review of meta-analyses and a systematic review and meta-analysis of the impact of heavy drinking occasions on risk for moderate drinkers”. BMC Medicine 12 (2014): 182.
  48. Mukamal K and Lazo M. “Alcohol and cardiovascular disease”. BMJ 356 (2017): j1340.
  49. Arranz S., et al. “Wine, beer, alcohol and polyphenols on cardiovascular disease and cancer”. Nutrients7 (2012): 759-781.
  50. Boateng D., et al. “Knowledge and awareness of and perception towards cardiovascular disease risk in sub-Saharan Africa: A systematic review”. PLoS One12 (2017): e0189264.
  51. Papadopoulos V., et al. “Comparison of stroke among Christians and Muslims in Thrace, Greece”. Rural Remote Health2 (2006): 505.
  52. Milan A., et al. “Arterial hypertension and cancer”. International Journal of Cancer 10 (2014): 2269-2277.
  53. Liang Z., et al. “Hypertension and risk of prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis”. Scientific Reports 6 (2016): 31358.
  54. Radišauskas R., et al. “Hypertension, serum lipids and cancer risk: A review of epidemiological evidence”. Medicina (Kaunas)2 (2016): 89-98.
  55. Han H., et al. “Hypertension and breast cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis”. Scientific Reports 7 (2017): 44877.
  56. Fumagalli C., et al. “β-blockers: Their new life from hypertension to cancer and migraine”. Pharmacological Research 151 (2020): 104587.
  57. Van Dorst DCH., et al. “Hypertension and Prohypertensive Antineoplastic Therapies in Cancer Patients”. Circulation Research 7 (2021): 1040-1061.
  58. Global Burden of Disease Cancer Collaboration, Fitzmaurice C, Abate D, Abbasi N, et al.
  59. Global, Regional, and National Cancer Incidence, Mortality, Years of Life Lost, Years Lived With Disability, and Disability-Adjusted Life-Years for 29 Cancer Groups, 1990 to 2017: A Systematic Analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study”. JAMA Oncology12 (2019): 1749-1768.
  60. Global Burden of Disease 2019 Cancer Collaboration, Kocarnik JM., et al. “Cancer Incidence, Mortality, Years of Life Lost, Years Lived with Disability, and Disability-Adjusted Life Years for 29 Cancer Groups From 2010 to 2019: A Systematic Analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019”. JAMA Oncology3 (2022): 420-444.

Citation

Citation: Ludmila Radkevich and Dariya Radkevich. “Comparative Analysis of Risk Factors for the Burden of Oncological Diseases in men in Muslim and Christian Countries with the Same Economic and Geographical Location". Acta Scientific Gastrointestinal Disorders 5.11 (2022): 10-30.

Copyright

Ludmila Radkevich and Dariya Radkevich. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




Metrics

Acceptance rate35%
Acceptance to publication20-30 days

Indexed In




News and Events


  • Certification for Review
    Acta Scientific certifies the Editors/reviewers for their review done towards the assigned articles of the respective journals.
  • Submission Timeline for Upcoming Issue
    The last date for submission of articles for regular Issues is December 15, 2022.
  • Publication Certificate
    Authors will be issued a "Publication Certificate" as a mark of appreciation for publishing their work.
  • Best Article of the Issue
    The Editors will elect one Best Article after each issue release. The authors of this article will be provided with a certificate of “Best Article of the Issue”.
  • Welcoming Article Submission
    Acta Scientific delightfully welcomes active researchers for submission of articles towards the upcoming issue of respective journals.
  • Contact US