Acta Scientific Gastrointestinal Disorders (ASGIS)(ISSN: 2582-1091)

Research Article Volume 5 Issue 6

Prevalence and factors associated with active H. pylori infection among the asymptomatic population and dyspeptic patients in Mwanza North-western Tanzania

Hyasinta Jaka1*, Andreas Mueller2, Stephen E Mshana3 and Christa Kasang4

1Department of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology Unit, the Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, Bugando, Mwanza, Tanzania
2Tropenmedizin, Missionsärztliche Klinik, Würzburg, German
3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, Bugando, Mwanza, Tanzania
4Medical Mission Institute, Würzburg, Germany

*Corresponding Author: Hyasinta Jaka, Department of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology Unit, the Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, Bugando, Mwanza, Tanzania.

Received: May 02, 2022; Published: May 19, 2022

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Abstract

Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is the commonest gastroenterological infection in the world. Studies have documented the magnitude of H. pylori infections to be high in developing countries where the living conditions are poor. This study has provided the prevalence of H. pylori infection and its associated factors among asymptomatic and dyspeptic patients in Mwanza, North - Western, Tanzania.

Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed among dyspeptic patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy at Bugando Medical Centre, Mwanza, Tanzania, and asymptomatic individuals in the city of Mwanza, Tanzania between August 2014 and September 2019. The diagnosis of H. pylori infection was done using rapid stool HpSA antigen test and data analysis was done using STATA version 13.

Results: The study included 353 dyspeptic patients with a median age of 40 (IQR 30-51) years and a total 349 asymptomatic individuals with median age of 25 (IQR:21-29), p = 0.001. With excpetion of gender, significant differences were observed among other social-demographic factors among the two groups. H. pylori infection was significantly more in the dyspeptic patients than in asymptomatic population (60.3%, 95% CI: 55.2-65.4 vs. 46.3%, 95% CI 41-51.5, P = 0.001). More than two person in the household (OR: 1.62, 95%CI: 1.00-2.62, P < 0.048), being employed, (OR: 4.84, 95%CI: 2.08-11.24, p-value < 0.001), being a farmer (OR: 3.77,95%Cl:1.60-8.88, p-value < 0.002) and being a businessman (OR: 3.05, 95%CI: 1.44-6.46, p-value < 0.003) independently predicted H. pylori infections among dyspepetic individuals while only being married was independent predictor of infection (OR: 1.7, 95%CI: 1.05-2.89,P = 0.031) among asymptomatic population.

Conclusion: H. pylori infections is significantly more in dyspeptic individuals and is predicted by multiple social demographic factors. H. pylori infected individuals were more likely to develop erosion and ulceration. Due to increase in H. pylori antibiotic resistance, there is a need to further investigate the susceptibility patterns of these strains for the purpose of establishing the appropriate empirical treatment guidelines to prevent associated morbidity and mortality. Based on the results from this study, we suggest that public health authorities should focus on preventive measures against H. pylori infection.

 

Keywords: H. pylori; Stool Antigen; Non-Ulcer Dyspepsia; Helicobacter Pylori

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Citation

Citation: Hyasinta Jaka., et al. “Prevalence and factors associated with active H. pylori infection among the asymptomatic population and dyspeptic patients in Mwanza North-western Tanzania". Acta Scientific Gastrointestinal Disorders 5.6 (2022): 25-33.




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