Acta Scientific Dental Sciences (ASDS)(ISSN: 2581-4893)

Mini Review Volume 6 Issue 1

Arsenic in Ground Water: A Possible Impact on Oral Health

Pritha Pal1* and Ajanta Halder2

1Assistant Professor, School of Life Sciences, Swami Vivekananda University, Kolkata, West Bengal, India

2Ex-Associate Professor, Department of Genetics, Vivekananda Institute of Medical Sciences, Ramakrishna Mission Seva Pratishthan, Kolkata, West Bengal, India

*Corresponding Author: Pritha Pal, Assistant Professor, School of Life Sciences, Swami Vivekananda University, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

Received: November 17, 2021; Published: December 16, 2021

Abstract

Heavy metal toxicity has been playing an important role in the development of cancer. The presence of metals like nickel, arsenic, lead etc. in the soils may turn out to be carcinogenic, by means of their adverse impact on human health. Although arsenic has a therapeutic value in the treatment of certain diseases like promyelocytic leukemia, syphilis, psoriasis, asthma, rheumatism, haemorrhoids, cough and pruritus, its toxicity is a major concern now a days, since it is an established carcinogen. Arsenic can cause acute as well as chronic toxicity. The acute toxicity is manifested through its presence in urine and blood, while its chronic toxicity can be detected by its presence in keratin containing tissues like hair, skin and nails. This metal has shown to exert its toxicity in various internal organs like lung, liver, kidney, gastro intestinal tract, bladder, spleen etc. including skin. It has been well established fact that arsenic has a strong association with the development of skin, bladder, lung carcinoma. Moreover, its association with oral carcinoma is also studied as an emerging area of research in the field of metal toxicity impact on human cancers.

Keywords: Arsenic; Toxicity; Cancer; Carcinogen; Acute; Chronic

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Citation

Citation: Pritha Pal and Ajanta Halder. “Arsenic in Ground Water: A Possible Impact on Oral Health". Acta Scientific Dental Sciences 6.1 (2022): 56-60.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2022 Pritha Pal and Ajanta Halder. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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