Acta Scientific Clinical Case Reports

Case ReportVolume 4 Issue 6

Gossypiboma as Rare Presentation: A Case Report

Daniyal Ahmed*, Hamna Khaliq, Reeda Salam and Danish Ahmed

Al-Nafees Medical College and Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan

*Corresponding Author: Daniyal Ahmed, Al-Nafees Medical College and Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan.

Received: March 10, 2023; Published: May 08, 2023

Abstract

Background: Gossypiboma is a rare condition caused by surgical sponges accidentally left inside the patient's body cavity after surgery. It can occur in various parts of the body and presents in the early or late postoperative period. Diagnosis is difficult due to non-specific symptoms and imaging methods that are mostly inconclusive. Open surgery is the most common treatment strategy for Gossypiboma.

Methodology: The case report describes a 32-year-old woman who presented to the OPD with lower abdominal pain, nausea, low-grade fever, abdominal distention, and altered bowel habits. She had a history of laparotomy eight years ago but had no relevant documents to show the nature of the surgery. On examination, a 6x6 cm hard mass was found in the right lumber and inguinal region. Basic investigations, including imaging tests such as ultrasound and MRI, were conducted. An elective laparotomy was done, and per-operatively, two foreign bodies resembling gauze pieces were removed from the complex mass.

Discussion: Gossypiboma can have diverse presentations and can be difficult to diagnose due to non-specific symptoms and inconclusive imaging methods. It is usually treated with open surgery, but there is no consensus on the best treatment approach. In this case, an elective laparotomy was done, and two foreign bodies were removed.

Conclusion: Gossypiboma is a rare condition that can have diverse presentations and can be difficult to diagnose. The most common treatment strategy is open surgery, but there is no consensus on the best approach.

 Keywords: Gossypiboma; Surgical Sponges; Laparotomy; Imaging Methods; Open Surgery

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Citation: Daniyal Ahmed., et al. “Gossypiboma as Rare Presentation: A Case Report". Acta Scientific Clinical Case Reports 4.6 (2023): 03-07.

Copyright: © 2023 Daniyal Ahmed., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.



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