Acta Scientific Cancer Biology (ASCB) (ISSN: 2582-4473)

Review Article Volume 7 Issue 4

The Potential of Liquid Biopsy in Cancer Diagnosis and Monitoring of Treatment Response

Lucy Mohapatra1*, Sweta Mishra2, Preeti Singh3, Pragya Srivastava3, Parul Mishra2, Vivekanand Prajapati2, Shivendra Misra2, Richa Tripathi4 and NT Pramathesh Mishra3

1Amity Institute of Pharmacy, Lucknow, Amity University, Uttar Pradesh, India
2Department of Pharmaceutics, Hygia College of Pharmacy, Dr APJ Abdul Kalam Technical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
3Department of Pharmacology, Hygia College of Pharmacy, Dr APJ Abdul Kalam Technical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
4Department of Pharmaceutics, Hygia Institute of Pharmacy, Dr APJ Abdul Kalam Technical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India

*Corresponding Author: MLucy Mohapatra, Amity Institute of Pharmacy, Lucknow, Amity University, Uttar Pradesh, India.

Received: May 15, 2023; Published: May 31, 2023

Abstract

Liquid biopsy, a non-invasive method of analyzing cancer biomarkers in blood and other bodily fluids, has emerged as a promising approach for cancer diagnosis and monitoring of treatment response. The three main types of liquid biopsy include circulating tumor cells (CTCs), cell-free DNA (cfDNA), and extracellular vesicles (EVs). Liquid biopsy offers several advantages over traditional tissue biopsy, including minimal invasiveness, ability to monitor disease progression in real-time, and potential for early cancer detection. However, challenges and limitations associated with liquid biopsy remain, such as the need for standardized protocols and assays, and the potential for false positives and negatives. Despite these challenges, liquid biopsy has shown great promise in clinical applications, such as monitoring of treatment response and resistance, and the identification of actionable mutations for targeted therapy. In conclusion, liquid biopsy holds great potential for improving cancer diagnosis and management, and ongoing research efforts will continue to refine and expand its clinical applications.

 Keywords: Liquid Biopsy; Cancer Diagnosis; Treatment Monitoring; Biomarkers; Personalized Medicine

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Citation

Citation: Lucy Mohapatra., et al. “The Potential of Liquid Biopsy in Cancer Diagnosis and Monitoring of Treatment Response" Acta Scientific Cancer Biology 7.4 (2023): 42-52.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2023 Lucy Mohapatra., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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Acceptance rate35%
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Impact Factor1.183

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