Acta Scientific Veterinary Sciences (ISSN: 2582-3183)

Research Article Volume 5 Issue 5

The Effect of Short-Term Treatment with Equine Serum Versus Conditioned Equine or Canine Serum in Three Research Dogs with Spontaneous Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca: A Case Series Pilot Study

Jacqueline Peraza1, Katrina Jones1, Kathryn Wotman1, David D Frisbie1,2 and Michala de Linde Henriksen1*

1 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado
2 Wayne McIlwraith Translational Medicine Institute, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collin, Colorado

*Corresponding Author: Michala de Linde Henriksen, Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado.

Received: March 20, 2023; Published: April 03, 2023

Abstract

Objective: To compare the safety and short-term clinical effect of three serum types [equine serum (ES), ‘equine interleukin-1 receptor antagonist protein’ serum (eq-IRAP), and canine IRAP serum (ca-IRAP)] on keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) in dogs.

Animals Studied: Three research dogs diagnosed with spontaneous KCS.

Procedures: Each dog was treated for three days, three times a day (TID) in both eyes (OU) with ES, followed by three days of treatment with eq-IRAP TID OU, followed by three days treatment with ca-IRAP TID OU. Clinical parameters (discharge, conjunctival hyperemia, chemosis) were scored on the last treatment day for each serum type. Schirmer tear test (STT) was measured throughout the study. The three different serum types were analyzed with ELISA kits for the concentration of equine interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (eq-IL-1Ra), and ca-IL-1Ra.

Results: All three serum types were well tolerated in the three dogs. Subjectively, dogs treated with ca-IRAP showed improved clinical parameters such as decreased conjunctival hyperemia. Objectively, no differences in STT were seen between the groups (P > 0.05). The highest concentration of IRAP was found in ca-IRAP analyzed for ca-IL-1Ra (299.7 pg/mL).

Conclusion: Topical ca-IRAP was noted to have the most significant clinical effect on evaluated parameters. Future long-term studies are needed to confirm the potential anti-inflammatory effect of topical ca-IRAP

Keywords: Conjunctivitis, Cytokines, Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist protein, Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, IRAP, KCS.

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Citation

Citation: Peraza., et al. “The Effect of Short-Term Treatment with Equine Serum Versus Conditioned Equine or Canine Serum in Three Research Dogs with Spontaneous Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca: A Case Series Pilot Study".Acta Scientific Veterinary Sciences 5.5 (2023): 04-11.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2023 Peraza., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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