Acta Scientific Veterinary Sciences (ISSN: 2582-3183)

Review Article Volume 4 Issue 10

Management of Subclinical Mastitis for Better Yield in Dairy Animals: A Review

Amit Kumar Singh1*, Upali Kisku2, C Bhakat3, A Mohammad4, A Chatterjee5, A Mandal6, DK Mandal3, M Karunakaran7 and TK Dutta5

1Subject Matter Specialist (Animal Husbandry), ICAR- Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Amihit, Jaunpur 2, Acharya Narendra Dev University of Agriculture and Technology, Ayodhya, India
2PhD Scholar, Dairy Extension Section, ICAR- National Dairy Research Institute, Eastern Regional Station, Kalyani, India
3Principal Scientist, Livestock Production Management Section, ICAR- National Dairy Research Institute, Eastern Regional Station, Kalyani, India
4Senior Scientist, Dairy Extension Section, ICAR- National Dairy Research Institute, Eastern Regional Station, Kalyani, India
5Principal, Animal Nutrition Section, ICAR- National Dairy Research Institute, Eastern Regional Station, Kalyani, India
6Principal Scientist, Animal Breeding Section, ICAR- National Dairy Research Institute, Eastern Regional Station, Kalyani, India
7Principal Scientist, Animal Reproduction Section, ICAR- National Dairy Research Institute, Eastern Regional Station, Kalyani, India

*Corresponding Author:Amit Kumar Singh, Subject Matter Specialist (Animal Husbandry), ICAR- Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Amihit, Jaunpur 2, Acharya Narendra Dev University of Agriculture and Technology, Ayodhya, India.

Received: September 09, 2022; Published: September 23, 2022

Abstract

There is a continuous challenge for improving quantity and quality of milk yield through dairy animals. However, dairy animals from their nature are susceptible towards subclinical mastitis (SM) as their physiology depends majorly upon its management and surrounding conditions. Symptoms of SM is invisible however, slowly it may deplete physiology of dairy animal’s Especially in the case of large dairy farms, the cases of SM are higher than that of small herd or dairy farm. Maintenance of proper management conditions that lowers the chances of dairy animals from getting exposed towards SM is highly recommended. However, behavior of microbes causing SM gets changed with varying climatic scenario. Improved management practices such as breeding management, balanced nutrition, milking practices, hygienic milking, dry cow management, proper handling, plant derived products; etc may help in preventing and controlling SM cases.SM causes high economic losses to whole dairy farming community and industry as well as it hampers the health status and well-being of dairy animals. Hence, proper knowledge of factors related to SM etiology and its management becomes necessary for both animals and dairy farmers. Therefore this review has been formulated to provide better understanding of SM and its management in dairy animals.

Keywords: Dairy Animals; Mastitis; Management; Milk yield

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Citation

Citation: Amit Kumar Singh., et al. “Management of Subclinical Mastitis for Better Yield in Dairy Animals: A Review". Acta Scientific Veterinary Sciences 4.10 (2022): 84-91.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2022 Amit Kumar Singh., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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