Acta Scientific Veterinary Sciences (ISSN: 2582-3183)

Research Article Volume 4 Issue 7

Behavioural and Physiological Responses of West African Dwarf Bucks to Burdizzo Castration After Scrotal Neck Infiltration with Lignocaine or Bupivacaine

Cecilia Omowumi Oguntoye*, Ohubakola A Ademola and Adeneran Adelmji

Department of Veterinary Surgery and Radiology, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

*Corresponding Author: Cecilia Omowumi Oguntoye, Department of Veterinary Surgery and Radiology, University of Ibadan, Nigeria.

Received: June 08, 2022; Published: June 30, 2022

Abstract

Unmitigated pain in farm animals is associated with suffering and distress and represents a welfare concern. To assess the efficacy of pre-emptive analgesia induced by the scrotal neck infiltration of either lignocaine (LIG) or bupivacaine (BUP) in goats, behavioral, physiological and serum cortisol responses were used as indicators of post- Burdizzo castration distress. Fifteen West African Dwarf male goats, aged between 9 and 11 months and weighing between 6 and 12 kg, were randomly allocated into three groups each treated with the scrotal neck infiltration with lignocaine (LIG), bupivacaine (BUP) or normal saline (SAL) respectively and followed 20 minutes later by Burdizzo castration. Frequency of pain behaviors of the treated goats were recorded over a 3h post-castration period by continuous direct observation from outside the pen. Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), rectal temperature (RT) and serum cortisol concentrations were determined at 10-, 90- and 180-minutes post-castration. Restlessness, head turning, bleating, ataxia and extended hind limb were observed in both treatment and control groups, Restlessness was however the most frequent. There were no significant (p > 0.05) differences in mean HR, RR and RT between and within the three treatment groups. In both LIG and BUP treatment groups, serum cortisol concentrations increased but decreased in the control group up to the 90 minutes interval. It was concluded that subcutaneous infiltration of the goats’ scrotal neck with either LIG or BUP did not influence pain behaviors but even tended to increase post-Burdizzo castration pain as measured by serum cortisol concentrations.

Keywords: West African Dwarf Bucks; Castration; Burdizzo; Lignocaine; Bupivacaine; Scrotal

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Citation

Citation: Cecilia Omowumi Oguntoye., et al. “Behavioural and Physiological Responses of West African Dwarf Bucks to Burdizzo Castration After Scrotal Neck Infiltration with Lignocaine or Bupivacaine". Acta Scientific Veterinary Sciences 4.7 (2022): 174-181.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2022 Cecilia Omowumi Oguntoye., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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