Acta Scientific Veterinary Sciences (ISSN: 2582-3183)

Case Report Volume 4 Issue 5

Thiamine Responsive Polioencephalomalacia in Goats

TA Shafi1*, MFMF Siddiqui1, MP Sakhare1, AM Syed2, PM Mane2, SS Lingayat3 and DS Chaunde3

1 1Assistant Professor, Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, MAFSU, Parbhani, Maharashtra, India
2 2Hospital Registrar, Teaching Veterinary Clinical Complex, College of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, MAFSU, Parbhani, Maharashtra, India
3 M.V.Sc. Scholar, Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, MAFSU, Parbhani, Maharashtra, India

*Corresponding Author: TA Shafi, Assistant Professor, Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, MAFSU, Parbhani, Maharashtra, India.

Received: March 09, 2022; Published: April 11, 2022

Abstract

Three adult goats were referred to the Department of Veterinary Medicine with a history of anorexia, dullness, attacks of head tremors, star gazing, convulsions and general weakness since past few days. The clinical signs varied from goat to goat. One goat was reared in intensive system being fed high concentrate diet and remaining two were reared in loose housing system being fed or having easy access to kitchen wastes rich in carbohydrates. Clinical examination revealed normal physiological parameters in all the three. All the cases were tentatively diagnosed as Polioencephalomalacia on the basis of typical clinical signs, and hence were treated with thiamine (vitamin B1) injection (20mg; intramuscularly), repeated hourly for first three doses and then continued for three days (BID). Treatment showed drastic response ranging from 1 to three hours with complete abolition of nervous signs, head tremors, convulsions and star-gazing posture. The response to initial treatment in case of one case (reared on intensive system) was partial and recovery was gradual and showed full recovery on day 3. The deficiency of B1 and subsequent underlying pathogenesis caused by its deficiency can be reversed by providing the enzyme immediately in the injectable form.

Keywords:Polioencephalomalacia; Vitamin B1; Ruminal Acidosis

References

  1. McDowell LR. “Vitamins in Animal Nutrition: Comparative Aspects to Human Nutrition”. San Diego, CA: Academic Press Inc (1989).
  2. Nithin BS., et al. “Occurrence and clinical assessment of ruminal lactic-acidosis in goats”. Indian Journal of Small Ruminants 2 (2020): 270-272.
  3. Alsaad KM. “Polioencephalomalacia Caused by Thiamine Deficiency in Sheep of Basrah. Province, Iraq”. Egyptian Journal of Veterinary Sciences1 (2019).
  4. Edwin EE and Jackman R. “Thiaminase I in the development of cerebrocortical necrosis in sheep and cattle”. Nature 228(1970): 772-774.
  5. Gould DH. “Polioencephalomalacia”. Journal of Animal Science 76 (1998): 309-314.
  6. Braun U., et al. “Ruminal lactic acidosis in sheep and goats”. Veterinary Research 130 (1992): 343-349.
  7. Karapinar T., et al. “Severe Thiamine Deficiency in Sheep with Acute Ruminal Lactic Acidosis”. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine 22 (2008): 662-665.
  8. Nema A., et al. “Polioencephalomalacia in goats: A case study”. Veterinary Clinical Science3 (2014): 48-51.

Citation

Citation: TA Shafi., et al. “Thiamine Responsive Polioencephalomalacia in Goats".Acta Scientific Veterinary Sciences 4.5 (2022): 62-64.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2022 TA Shafi., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




Metrics

Acceptance rate35%
Acceptance to publication20-30 days
Impact Factor1.008

Indexed In





News and Events


Contact US