Acta Scientific Veterinary Sciences (ISSN: 2582-3183)

Research Article Volume 4 Issue 4

Effects of Storage Methods and Storage Durations on Physicochemical and Total Bacterial Count of Bulked Milk from West African Dwarf (WAD) Goats

Essien Kemfon Friday1*, James, Ikechukwu James1, Ojo Abidemi Esther2, Nwosu Emmanuela Uchenna1, Smith Olusuji Fredrick1, Ononuga, Onatoba Loveth1, Ameh Peter Friday1 and Akinyemi Olabode Maxwell1

1Department of Animal Physiology, Federal University of Agriculture, Ogun State, Nigeria
2Department of Microbiology, Federal University of Agriculture, Ogun State, Nigeria

*Corresponding Author: Essien Kemfon Friday, Department of Animal Physiology, Federal University of Agriculture, Ogun State, Nigeria.

Received: January 19, 2022; Published: March 14, 2022

Abstract

The quality of goats’ milk can become labile if not aseptically handled and stored properly. thus, there is need for immediate cooling of milk to ameliorate putrefaction. This study investigated effects of storage methods and storage durations on physicochemical and total bacterial count of bulked milk from west Africandwarf (wad) goats. The milk collected was bulked, refrigerated at 6°c and frozen at -4°c for duration of 0 hour (fresh), 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, 144 and 168 hours respectively. The result showed that storage method and duration significantly (p < 0.05) affected protein, lactose, solid non-fat, moisture, casein, total solids contents, titratable acidity and ph of milk. Refrigerated milk had higher (p < 0.05) protein, ph, casein and moisture contents while frozen milk had higher (p < 0.05) lactose, solid non-fat and total solids contents. Highest values of protein, casein and ph were obtained at 0 hour (fresh), however, it decreased from 24 to 168 hours without definite trend. The interaction between storage methods and storage duration had effects only on titratable acidity and ph of the bulked milk. Storage method and duration had no significant (p > 0.05) effect on total bacterial count (tbc) of milk from wad goats. The isolated bacterial in this study at 0 and 24 hours were Shigella, Pseudomonas Aeruginosa, Esherichia Coli, Staphylococcus Aureus, Staphylococcus Epidermis, Salmonella Enteric. The study concluded that bulked milk of wad goats can retain its nutrient content by refrigerating and freezing up to 48 hours.

Keywords: Goat Milk, West African Dwarf Goats, Physicochemical Properties, Storage Conditions, Bacterial Count

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Citation

Citation: Essien Kemfon Friday., et al. “Effects of Storage Methods and Storage Durations on Physicochemical and Total Bacterial Count of Bulked Milk from West African Dwarf (WAD) Goats”. Acta Scientific Veterinary Sciences 4.4 (2022): 50-58.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2022 Nwosu Emmanuela Uchenna., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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