Acta Scientific Veterinary Sciences (ISSN: 2582-3183)

Review Article Volume 3 Issue 10

Feeding of Sea Buckthorn Leaf Meal in Poultry: An Overview

DN Singh1*, PK Shukla2, A Bhattacharyya3, Sarvajeet Yadav2, Rajneesh Sirohi1 and Mamta1

1Assistant Professor, Department of LPM, College of Veterinary Science and Animal Husbandry, DUVASU, Mathura, India
2Professor and Head, Department of Poultry Science, DUVASU, Mathura, India
3Assistant Professor, Department of Poultry Science, College of Veterinary Science and Animal Husbandry, DUVASU, Mathura, India

*Corresponding Author: DN Singh, Assistant Professor, Department of LPM, College of Veterinary Science and Animal Husbandry, DUVASU, Mathura, India.

Received: July 28, 2021; Published: September 20, 2021

Abstract

  The continuous impressive growth in poultry sector is due to the technological intervention and breakthrough in terms of scientific feeding, breeding, management and health care by use of non-conventional feed and fodder resources to reduce the feeding cost as well as alternate feed resources for poultry. Sea buckthorn leaf meal is one of them, which is extensively used as non-conventional feed resources especially in the North western Himalayan regions. Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.), an ancient shrub belongs to the family Elaeagnaceae has recently gained worldwide attention and popularity mainly due to its nutritional and medicinal value as the leaves, berries, pulp and seed contains different kinds of essential nutrients and bioactive compounds including vitamin A, B1, B12, C, E, and K; flavonoids, tocoferols, lycopene, carotenoids, and phytosterols. The sea buckthorn leaf meal is rich with various types of potent growth promoters, antioxidants, and antibacterial, antiviral and immuno-modulation properties. Dietary supplementation of sea buckthorn leaf meal leads to improving quality and quantity of egg production performances, immune-modulation, and longevity, health performance, breeding performances, while improving the growth rate, carcass quality, immunity, health status and longevity in broiler birds.

Keywords: Chabro; FCR; HHEP; Immuno-modulation; NCFR; SBTLM

References

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Citation

Citation: DN Singh., et al. “Feeding of Sea Buckthorn Leaf Meal in Poultry: An Overview". Acta Scientific Veterinary Sciences 3.10 (2021): 41-45.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2021 DN Singh., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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