Acta Scientific Neurology (ASNE) (ISSN: 2582-1121)

Research Article Volume 5 Issue 7

Anger and Health Clinical and Personality Syndromes in Cardiac Transplant Patients

Espinosa-Gil Rosa María1* and Monteagudo Santamaría María2

1FEA Clinical Psychology, Rehabilitation Service, Hospital Clínico Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain
2FEA Rehabilitation, Head of the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service. Rehabilitation Service, Hospital Clínico Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain

*Corresponding Author: Espinosa-Gil Rosa María, FEA Clinical Psychology, Rehabilitation Service, Hospital Clínico Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.

Received: May 06,2022; Published:

Abstract

Introduction: Numerous studies have proliferated to clarify the personality types that show an implication in the development of cardiovascular diseases, especially type A and Type D personality, although in clinical practice we also find people with type C personality pattern, who although more predisposed to suffer cancer among other factors, we believe that it is also related to cardiovascular problems.

Objectives: To analyze the personality traits and the characteristic clinical syndromes inpopulation that will be subjected to cardiac transplantation.

 To analyze if the perceived social support is related to a better coping with the disease.

 Method

Sample: The group was composed of 10 patients who have been included in the rehabilitation program in pre-heart transplantation (7 women and 3 men).

Clinical interview

Instruments

  • MCMIII MILLON Multiaxial Clinical Inventory of Millon [1].
  • Analog scale of perceived social support (0 to 10).

Conclusion: By way of conclusion we can establish that the pattern of behavior type A [2], with characteristics of fidelity, competitiveness and hostility could be related to narcissistic traits.

 The Type C Personality [3] characterized by emotional inhibition, being complacent and conformist, among other things, with clinical pattern of compulsive personality and type D personality [4] tendency to experience negative emotions and tendency to social inhibition, with somatoform clinical syndrome, anxiety, disthymia and severe clinical syndrome of major depression with autolytic ideation in our studied sample of patients awaiting heart transplantation.

No patient showed severe personality pathology.

52.9% of our sample presented relational difficulties in the cardiac pre-transplant.

If we improve anger management, our relationships and social support will improve, and this will result in a preventive improvement on our cardiovascular health.

Keywords: Personality; Health; Cancer; Anger; Hostility; Heart Disease; Social Support

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Citation

Citation: Espinosa-Gil Rosa María and Monteagudo Santamaría María. “Anger and Health Clinical and Personality Syndromes in Cardiac Transplant Patients". Acta Scientific Neurology 5.7 (2022): 00-00.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2022 Espinosa-Gil Rosa María and Monteagudo Santamaría María. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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