Acta Scientific Neurology (ASNE) (ISSN: 2582-1121)

Invited Review Volume 5 Issue 4

Approach to Narcolepsy - A Rare but Potentially Treatable Sleep Disorder!

Lakshmi Priya and Ashalatha Radhakrishnan*

Comprehensive Centre for Sleep disorders, Department of Neurology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India

*Corresponding Author:Ashalatha Radhakrishnan, Comprehensive Centre for Sleep disorders, Department of Neurology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India.

Received: March 01, 2022; Published: March 25, 2022

Abstract

‘Narcolepsy’ comes from French narcolepsie, which was first used by French physician Jean-Baptiste Edouard Gelineau in 1880. This French word came from a combination of Greek narke, meaning stupor or numbness, and lepsis, meaning a seizure. The tetrad of narcolepsy symptoms proposed by Yoss., et al. in 1957 consists of excessive daytime somnolence, hypnogogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis and cataplexy [1]. Narcolepsy is a chronic neurologic condition due to dysregulation of sleep wake cycle, affecting 1 in 3000 individuals with a bimodal peak of incidence at 15 and 36 years of age [2]. However, there is a diagnostic delay inspite of early age of onset partly due to limited awareness of this entity among physicians and partly due to the associated comorbidity burden among patients with Narcolepsy [3].

Keywords: Narcolepsy; Cataplexy; Hypocretin; SOREMPs; MSLT

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Citation

Citation: Lakshmi Priya and Ashalatha Radhakrishnan. “Approach to Narcolepsy - A Rare but Potentially Treatable Sleep Disorder!". Acta Scientific Neurology 5.4 (2022): 19-25.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2022 Lakshmi Priya and Ashalatha Radhakrishnan. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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