Acta Scientific Microbiology

Research Article Volume 7 Issue 3

Enterococcus Unleashed: Decoding the Rise of a Formidable Pathogenic Force

Safiya Mehraj1,2* and Zahoor Ahmad Parry1,2

1Clinical Microbiology and PK/PD Division, Srinagar and Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research [AcSIR], India
2CSIR- Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine, Srinagar and Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research [AcSIR], India

*Corresponding Author: Zahoor Ahmad Parry, CSIR- Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine, Srinagar and Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research [AcSIR], India.

Received: January 23, 2024; Published: February 21, 2024

Abstract

Enterococcus, once considered innocuous residents of the human gastrointestinal tract, has emerged as a formidable pathogenic force, challenging the realms of infectious diseases. This abstract delves into the intricate facets of Enterococcus's evolution from a commensal organism to a potent pathogen, exploring the factors underlying its transformation. The rise of antibiotic resistance within Enterococcus species has triggered a paradigm shift, rendering conventional treatment strategies ineffective. This review navigates the molecular mechanisms that contribute to Enterococcus's adaptability, emphasizing the role of horizontal gene transfer in disseminating resistance genes. The intricate interplay between antibiotic exposure and the genomic plasticity of Enterococcus has fueled its capacity to withstand a myriad of antimicrobial agents. Furthermore, the abstract elucidates the epidemiological trends and global spread of Enterococcus-associated infections. Understanding the intricate dynamics of Enterococcus transmission is pivotal for devising effective public health interventions. The exploration of its ability to persist in diverse ecological niches underscores the challenges in eradicating this resilient pathogen. The virulence factors employed by Enterococcus in evading host defences’ and establishing infections are dissected, shedding light on the intricate host-pathogen interactions. This comprehensive analysis underscores the need for targeted therapeutic approaches and the development of novel antimicrobial agents to combat Enterococcus infections.
In conclusion, the abstract accentuates the urgency of unraveling the molecular, epidemiological, and clinical dimensions of Enterococcus's ascension as a formidable pathogenic force. By deciphering the intricacies of its evolution and resistance mechanisms, researchers can pave the way for innovative strategies to mitigate the impact of Enterococcus-associated infections on global health.

Keywords: Enterococcus; Pathogenic Force; Antibiotic Resistance; Healthcare-Associated Infections; Virulence FactorsUrine; Dog Urine

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    Citation

    Citation: Safiya Mehraj and Zahoor Ahmad Parry. “Enterococcus Unleashed: Decoding the Rise of a Formidable Pathogenic Force".Acta Scientific Microbiology 7.3 (2024): 58-77.

    Copyright

    Copyright: © 2024 Safiya Mehraj and Zahoor Ahmad Parry. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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