Acta Scientific Microbiology

Research Article Volume 7 Issue 2

Exploring the Effects of Biocontrol and Plant Growth-Promoting Trichoderma spp. on Initial Root Growth and Nodulation in Cicer arietinum

Isha Patel, Rinkal Mulani and Rupesh Jha*

Department of Biotechnology, Shri Alpesh N Patel Postgraduate Institute of Science and Research, Sardar Patel University, Anand, Gujarat, India

*Corresponding Author: Rupesh Jha, Assistant Professor, Department of Biotechnology, Shri Alpesh N Patel Postgraduate Institute of Science and Research, Sardar Patel University, Anand, Gujarat, India, Gujarat, India.

Received: December 07, 2023; Published: January 04, 2024

Abstract

In nowadays leguminous plant production in all over the world is high, and farmers are also used various types of chemical fertilizers, which reduce soil fertility and are harmful to soil microbes. In this research, we used the Trichoderma strains like Trichoderma longibranchium, Trichoderma ressie, Trichoderma harzinium, and Trichoderma viride used as biofertilizer and biocontrol agents. A soil survivability test was performed to analyze how much time Trichoderma live ups into the soil, a Root colonization assay was performed for the detection of Trichoderma strains that colonized over the root or not, and further compatibility test isolated Rhizobium pusense PR4 and Trichoderma for capable to each other on the same environment or not. Nodule formation effect checked those plants with treated different organisms. in the plant treated with dual culture PR4+T10, at least one nodule formation occurs, otherwise only plant treated with Rhizobium PR4, four nodules are observed. In this paper, we analyzed how Trichoderma affected the chickpea plant (Cicer arietinum L.), the nodulation process when applied in soil, and reduced the number of nodules by indirectly inhibiting or declining the growth of nodulation bacteria. Plant growth is facilitated by Trichoderma strain, but nitrogen fixation is insufficient in leguminous plants.

Keywords: Trichoderma spp; Rhizobium spp; Nodules; Compability, Leguminous Plant

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Citation

Citation: Rupesh Jha., et al. “Exploring the Effects of Biocontrol and Plant Growth-Promoting Trichoderma spp. on Initial Root Growth and Nodulation in Cicer arietinum".Acta Scientific Microbiology 7.2 (2024): 14-20.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2024 Rupesh Jha., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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