Acta Scientific Microbiology (ISSN: 2581-3226)

Research Article Volume 5 Issue 5

Consumer Attitude on Vendors Practices and Safety Aspects of Street Foods in Selected Study Area of Kanchipuram (Dt)

A Nirmala*, M Logeshwari and S Santhanabharathi

Department of Biotechnology, Aarupadai Veedu Institute of Technology, Vinayaka Missions Research Foundation, Paiyanoor, Kanchipuram (Dt), India

*Corresponding Author: A Nirmala, Department of Biotechnology, Aarupadai Veedu Institute of Technology, Vinayaka Missions Research Foundation, Paiyanoor, Kanchipuram (Dt), India.

Received: March 28, 2022; Published: April 29, 2022

Abstract

Background: Street foods play an important role in people’s daily food options and their regular nutritional requirements are dependents on these foods, as their ever-growing busy schedule take away the chance to eat homemade food. Over the years, many food-borne diseases were reported due to contaminated non-homemade food consumption.

Objective: This study was conducted to analyse the microbiological quality of foods which are sold on street side and to compare the microbial load with petty shop and restaurant.

Materials and Methods: Most commonly consumed food items (Samosa, Panipuri) from street stall, petty shop and restaurant were collected according to the survey taken and these samples were tested for microbial quality.

Results: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Staphylococcus aureus like pathogenic organisms were found in these food items. Antibiotic sensitivity test was carried out with Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi and Staphylococcus aureus are resistant to Kanamycin, Penicillin and Streptomycin.

Conclusion: The microbial load found in restaurant foods was lower than street and petty shop foods.

Keywords: Street Food; Homemade Food; Antibiotics; Food Borne Disease; Microbial Load

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Citation

Citation: A Nirmala., et al. “Consumer Attitude on Vendors Practices and Safety Aspects of Street Foods in Selected Study Area of Kanchipuram (Dt)". Acta Scientific Microbiology 5.5 (2022): 114-120.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2022 A Nirmala.,et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




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