Acta Scientific Microbiology (ASMI) (ISSN: 2581-3226)

Review Article Volume 3 Issue 11

Superhero Genes in Axolotl Limb Regeneration: Could Deadpool be Real?

Atakan Z Namli* and Zeynep Gençyiğit

Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Faculty of Arts and Science, Inonu University, Turkey

*Corresponding Author: Atakan Z Namli, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Faculty of Arts and Science, Inonu University, Turkey.

Received: September 25, 2020; Published: October 30, 2020

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Abstract

  Axolotls (Ambystoma Mexicanum) are vertebrates that have the ability to limb regeneration their body parts compared to most of other living populations. How this regeneration process works, how its mechanism takes place, and how blastemas are formed during differentiation are still being studied by researchers. Therewithal, it is known that many genes have significant effects in this regeneration process. Tgf-β1, Fgf-8, Pax3 and Pax7, Lin28, Msx-2, HGF, Hoxb13 and Hoxc10 are some of these genes. It is also observed that some genes involved in the regeneration process in the human liver are common with some genes involved in limb regeneration in axolotls. Understanding this limb regeneration that occurs in axolotls is thought to have an inspiring importance in the treatment of limb amputation or loss as a result of various traumas in humans, especially in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

Keywords: Regeneration; Ambystoma Mexicanum; Liver Regeneration; Amputation; Proliferation; Dedifferentiation; Cell Growth; Blastema; Epithelium; Epidermal; Mesenchymal; Gene Expression; Progenitor

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Citation

Citation: Atakan Z Namli and Zeynep Gençyiğit. “Superhero Genes in Axolotl Limb Regeneration: Could Deadpool be Real?". Acta Scientific Microbiology 3.11 (2020): 98-107.




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