Acta Scientific Microbiology (ASMI) (ISSN: 2581-3226)

Research Article Volume 3 Issue 4

Evolution of ECG Abnormalities in Immune Dysfunction Exacerbation Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Khan Salman1*, Singh Priti2 and Salieva Rana3*

1Assistant Professor, Department of Pathological Analysis, Knowledge University , Erbil, Iraq
2International medical faculty, Osh State University, Osh, Kyrgyzstan
3Lecturer, Department of pulmonary, Osh State University, Osh, Kyrgyzstan

*Corresponding Author: Khan Salman, Assistant Professor, Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Pathological Analysis, Knowledge University, Erbil, Iraq.

Received: March 23, 2020; Published: March 31, 2020

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Abstract

Objective: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of death worldwide. Early identification of the complications, particularly, atherosclerosis, pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular dysfunction can prevent or delay long-term complications. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of ECG abnormalities in COPD patients with exacerbation and COPD phenotypes.

Methods: The study population consisted of 364 COPD patients aged 21 to 85 years of either sex. This study was carried out in the department of pulmonology, Osh Interregional United Clinical Hospital, Osh, Kyrgyzstan. Between December 2016 to February 2020. The patients who are diagnosed as having COPD as per GOLD guidelines. ECG was performed with the help of Department of Cardiology.

Results: Highest cases of COPD were found in the age group of 51-65. According to physical examination, spirometry and x-ray out of 364 COPD patients, blue bloaters (BB) 257 (70.60%), Pink puffers (PP) 41 (11.26%) and Mixed 66 (18.31%) were found. Highest BB and mixed were found in 51-65 age group, PP in > 65 age group. Out of 218 male COPD patients, BB 149 (66.97%), PP 26 (11.93%) and Mixed 43 (19.72%) were found. Out of 146 female COPD patients, BB 108 (73.97%), PP 15 (10.27%) and Mixed 23 (15.75%) were found.
Out of 364 patients P wave was abnormal in 128 (35.16%). Tachycardia was observed in 113 (31.04%), Bradycardia 9 (2.47%) and 247 (66.86%) were with normal heart rate. Right heart axis deviation was found in 77 (21.15%), left 39 (10.17%), vertical 1 (0.27%) and 247 (66.86%) found normal. Vertical heart positioned patients found 87 (23.90%), horizontal 38 (10.44%) and 239 (65.66%) found normal. Low voltage was observed in 20 (5.49%). Incomplete right bundle branch block found in 64 (17.58%) and complete right bundle branch block found in 02 (0.55%). ST changes observed in 146 (40.11%). Tall RV1 was seen in 42 (11.54%) and Deep SV6 was observed in 169 (46.43%).

Conclusion: Comparative prevalence was higher in males and 51 - 65 age group at high risk in both sex. Highest BB and mixed found in 51 - 65 age group, PP in > 65 age group. Phenotype BB was more prevalent.ECG abnormalities P-pulmonale, Tachycardia, Right heart axis deviation, Vertical heart position, IRBBB, ST changes Tall RV1 and SV6 was most prevalent. Early diagnosis and management can prevent disease progression of atherosclerosis and hypertension.

Keywords: COPD; Electrocardiography; Blue Bloaters; Pink Puffers; Hypertension; Atherosclerosis

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Citation

Citation: Khan Salman., et al. “Evolution of ECG Abnormalities in Immune Dysfunction Exacerbation Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease". Acta Scientific Microbiology 3.4 (2020): 195-201.



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