Acta Scientific Dental Sciences (ISSN: 2581-4893)

Research Article Volume 4 Issue 7

Prevalence of Odontogenic-Related Maxillary Sinus Pathologies in an United States Dental School Population

Yueh Ju Hsiao1*, Shang Lun (Allen) Liu2, Jie Yang3, Randolph R Resnik4 and Jon B Suzuki5

1Assistant Professor in the Department of Periodontology and Oral Implantology, Temple University Kornberg School of Dentistry, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
2Periodontist, Private Practice, Federal Way, Washington, USA
3Professor and Director of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Temple University Kornberg School of Dentistry, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
4Adjunct Clinical Professor, Department of Periodontology and Oral Implantology, Temple University Kornberg School of Dentistry, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
5Professor, Department of Periodontology and Oral Implantology, Temple University Kornberg School of Dentistry, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

*Corresponding Author: Yueh Ju Hsiao, Assistant Professor in the Department of Periodontology and Oral Implantology, Temple University Kornberg School of Dentistry, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Received: June 02, 2020; Published: June 16, 2020

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Abstract

Objectives: Odontogenic-related maxillary sinus pathologies are identified in cone beam computerized tomography taken for maxillary sinus augmentation and dental implant therapies. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of odontogenic-related maxillary sinus pathologies among a dental school population.

Materials and Methods: Eight hundred and twenty-one patients were retrospectively evaluated for odontogenic-related maxillary sinus pathologies using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Age, gender, ethnicity, and dentition status were evaluated to determine potential relationships of the presence of odontogenic-related sinus pathologies.

Results: Among 534 CBCT scans, 331 scans presented without sinus pathology bilaterally and 203 scans presented with sinus pathologies in one or both sinuses. 79 scans presented with odontogenic-related maxillary sinus pathologies. The most frequent observations were mucosal thickening. The tooth most frequently associated with pathologic findings were first molars followed by second molars. The findings were higher in males than females (p = 0.006). Age and ethnicity was not a significant factor (p = 0.10, p = 0.05). Dentition status showed root canals (34.65%) were the most commonly associated with pathology.

Conclusion: The prevalence of odontogenic-related maxillary sinus pathology was found in 36% of sinuses. Identification and management of odontogenic pathologies are essential to minimize complications. CBCT is highly recommended as a diagnostic tool prior to lateral wall maxillary sinus augmentation surgery and implant placement. Management of odontogenic-related maxillary sinus pathologies need to be tailored to individual patients and involves varying combinations of medical and dental management.

Keywords: Cone Beam Computed Tomography; Maxillary Sinus Pathologies; Maxillary Sinusitis; Odontogenic Sinusitis

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Citation

Citation: Yueh Ju Hsiao., et al. “Prevalence of Odontogenic-Related Maxillary Sinus Pathologies in an United States Dental School Population”. Acta Scientific Dental Sciences 4.7 (2020): 33-42.



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