Acta Scientific Clinical Case Reports

Review Article Volume 1 Issue 5

Introducing COVID-19 as an Evolutionary Metabolic Infectious Disease (EMID)

Sorush Niknamian*

Military Medicine Department, Liberty University, Virginia, Lynchburg, USA

*Corresponding Author: Sorush Niknamian, Military Medicine Department, Liberty University, Virginia, Lynchburg, USA.

Received: May 07, 2020; Published: May 22, 2020

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Abstract

Background: Coronaviruses are a group of related viruses that cause diseases in mammals and birds. In humans, coronaviruses cause respiratory tract infections that can range from mild to lethal. Mild illnesses include some cases of the common cold, while more lethal varieties can cause SARS, MERS, and COVID-19. The outbreak was identified in Wuhan, China, in December 2019, declared to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern on 30 January 2020, and recognized as a pandemic on 11 March 2020. Introduction: Coronaviruses are the subfamily Orthocoronavirinae, within the family of Coronaviridae, order Nidovirales, and realm Riboviria. They are enveloped viruses with a positive-sense single-stranded RNA genome and a nucleocapsid of helical symmetry. The genome size of coronaviruses is approximately from 26 to 32 kilobases. Coronaviruses were first discovered in the 1930s and Human coronaviruses were discovered in the 1960s. The earliest ones studied were from human patients with the common cold, which were later named human coronavirus 229E and human coronavirus OC43. Other human coronaviruses have since been identified, including SARS-CoV in 2003, HCoV NL63 in 2004, HKU1 in 2005, MERS-CoV in 2012, and SARS-CoV-2 in 2019. Most of these have involved serious respiratory tract infections.

Results and Discussion: Based on our multidisciplinary research, we have found the major cause and some treatments methods for fighting this powerful pathogen. The prime cause of COVID-19 is pushing the mitochondrial to lose MMP. A loss of the MMP by any mechanism leads to functional and structural collapse of the mitochondria and cell death. Mitophagy plays an important role in maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis but can also eliminate healthy mitochondria in cases such as cell starvation, viral invasion and erythroid cell differentiation. The mitochondrial fusion and fission are highly dynamic. Viruses specially COVID-19, interfere with these processes to distort mitochondrial dynamic to facilitate their proliferation. Thus, interfering with these processes promotes the interference of different cellular signaling pathways. The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) escapes the innate immune response by translocating its ORF-9b to mitochondria and promotes proteosomal degradation of dynamin-like protein (Drp1) leading to mitochondrial fission. We also researched on Ultrasonic Energy to destroy the virus which lead to positive results but it needs more future research. The most destructive way of viruses is to enhance Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and free radicals in human contaminated cell which cause inflammation in a host cell. ELF-EMF convert free radicals into less active molecules and eliminate them into two pathways which has been discussed in the discussion part. Using ELF-EMF affects the second pathway that relies on the activity of the catalase and superoxide dismutase enzymes which is the most effective pathway. For the best result of treatment, is the use of low-frequency magnetic fields (LFMF) plus EMF-ELF which penetrate into deeper tissues, cells and mitochondria. We also have gone through many researches since 1920 and found if we emit the frequency as the same frequency of COVID-19, can cause resonance in the virus and destroy it. So, we measured the SARS-CoV-2 frequency by Cyclotron and calculated the frequency of the virus is 30 KHz - 500 KHz.

Conclusion: COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) is one of the most complex virus which has been discovered since 2020. Until today, there has been no Antiviral Drug which can be useful in the treatment of this infectious disease has been discovered till today. COVID-19 genomic sequence containing SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV and Influenza A. Therefore, there is a high possibility of continuing COVID-19 even in summer. To gain the best result in treatment, we should use low-frequency magnetic fields (LFMF) plus EMF which penetrate into deeper tissues, cells and mitochondria in order to reduce ROS and Inflammation. In order to destroy SARS-CoV-2 virus in environment and also in infected individuals, we should use ELF-EMF plus LFMF. We also have gone through many researches since 1920 and found if we emit the frequency as the same frequency of COVID-19, it can cause resonance in the virus and destroy it. So, we measured the SARS-CoV-2 frequency by Cyclotron and calculated the frequency of the virus that id is 30 KHz - 500 KHz. The differences in the frequencies is due to the size of the virus which is from 26 to 32 Kilobases.

Keywords: COVID-19; Mitochondria; Cyclotron; Resonance; Frequency; MMP; Royal Raymond Rife Protocol; Ultrasound Energy; LFMF; ELF-EMF; Immunodeficiency; Immune Response; Protein Mismatch in COVID-19

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Citation

Citation: Sorush Niknamian. “Introducing COVID-19 as an Evolutionary Metabolic Infectious Disease (EMID)”. Acta Scientific Clinical Case Reports 1.5 (2020): 08-16.



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