Acta Scientific Dental Sciences (ISSN: 2581-4893)

Review Article Volume 4 Issue 2

Three Rooted Primary Mandibular First Molar-A Rare Case Report

KM Rowank Jahan1, Tazdik G Chowdhury1*,Tasnim-A-Jannat2, Ashik Abdullah Imon3, Puja Shrestha4, Nimesh Shrestha4 and Mahmuda Akhter5

1Lecturer, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Update Dental College and Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh
2Associate Professor and Head, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Update Dental College and Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh
3Lecturer, Department of Consevative Dentistry and Endodontics, Update Dental College and Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh
4Assistant Professor and Head, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Update Dental College and Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh Internee Doctor, Update Dental College and Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh
5Associate Professor, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh

*Corresponding Author: Tazdik G Chowdhury, Lecturer, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Update Dental College and Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Received: October 22, 2019; Published: January 07, 2020

×

Abstract

  A stem cell is essentially a ‘blank’ cell, capable of becoming another more differential cell type in the body, such as a skin cell, a muscle cell, or a nerve cell. Microscopic in size, stem cells are big news in medical science circle because they can be used to replace or even heal damaged tissues and cells in the body. It can play a leading role as it bears a unique property of differentiating into a required cell. Thus it can be a bank of cells which can be stimulated or triggered to get differentiated into any morphologically developed cell and function as so. This review, outlines the sources and the tremendous power these adult stem cell possess and ways of harnessing it for the benefit of humankind.

Keywords: Adult Stem Cell; Dimension

×

References

  1. Shilpa G., et al. “Prevalence of dental anomalies in deciduous dentition and its association with succedaneous dentition: A cross-sectional study of 4180 South Indian children”. Journal of Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry 35 (2017): 56-62.
  2. Ming-Gene Tu., et al. “Prevalence of Three-rooted PrimaryMandibular First Molars in Taiwan”. Journal of the Formosan Medical Association 109.1 (2010).
  3. Falk WV and Bowers DF. “Bilateral three rooted mandibular first primary molars: Report of case”. Journal of Dentistry for Children 50 (1983): 136-137.
  4. Nagaven NB and Umashankara KV. “Radix entomolaris and paramolaris in children: A review of the literature”. Journal of Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry 30 (2012): 94-102.
  5. Tu MG., et al. “Prevalence of three-rooted mandibular first molars among Taiwanese individuals”. Journal of Endodontics 33 (2007): 1163-1166.
  6. Tratman EK. “Three-rooted lower molars in man and their racial distribution”. British Dental Journal 64 (1938): 264-274.
  7. Steelman R. “Incidence of an accessory distal root on mandibular first permanent molars in Hispanic children”. ASDC Journal of Dentistry for Children 53 (1986): 122-123.
  8. Liu JF., et al. “Prevalence of 3-rooted primary mandibular second molars among Chinese patients”. Pediatric Dentistry 32 (2010): 123-126.
  9. De Souza-Freitas JA., et al. “Anatomic variations of lower first permanent molar roots in two ethnic groups”. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology 31 (1971): 278-278.
  10. Somogyi-Csizmazia W and Simons AJ. “Three-rooted mandibular first permanent molars in Alberta Indian children”. Journal of the Canadian Dental Association 37 (1971): 105-106.
  11. Carabelli G. “Systematisches Handbuch der Zahnheikunde”. 2nded. Vol. 114. Vienna: Braumuller and Seidel (1844).
  12. De Moor RJ., et al. “The radix entomolaris in mandibular first molars: An endodontic challenge”. International Endodontic Journal 37 (2004): 789-799.
  13. Carlsen O and Alexandersen V. “Radix paramolaris in permanent mandibular molars: Identification and morphology”. Scandinavian Journal of Dental Research 99 (1991): 189-195.
  14. Bolk L. “Bemerkungen u ber Wurzelvariationen am menschlichen unteren Molaren”. Zeiting fur Morphologie Anthropologie 17 (1915): 605-610.
  15. Mokhtari S and Mokhtari S. “Primary mandibular first molar with three reports”. Journal of Pakistan Oral Dental 33 (2013): 74-75.
  16. Badger GR. “Three rooted mandibular first primary molar”. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, and Oral Radiology 53 (1982): 547. 
  17. Falk WV and Bowers DF. “Bilateral three rooted mandibular first primary molars: Report of case”. Journal of Dentistry for Children 50 (1983): 136-137. 
  18. Reichart PA and Metah D. “Three-rooted permanent mandibular first molars in the Thai”. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 9 (1981): 191-192.
  19. Curzon ME. “Miscegenation and the prevalence of three-rooted mandibular first molars in Baffin Eskimo”. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 2 (1974): 130-131.
  20. Huang RY., et al. “Mandibular disto-lingual root: a consideration in periodontal therapy”. Journal of Periodontology 78 (2007): 1485-1490.
  21. Calberson FL., et al. “The radix entomolaris and paramolaris: clinical approach in endodontics”. Journal of Endodontics 33 (2007): 58-63.
  22. Goerig AC and Camp JH. “Root canal treatment in primary teeth: a review”. Pediatric Dentistry 5 (1983): 33-37.
  23. Gulabivala K., et al. “Root and canal morphology of Thai mandibular molars”. International Endodontic Journal 35 (2002): 56-62.
  24. Gulabivala K., et al. “Root and canal morphology of Burmese mandibular molars”. International Endodontic Journal 34 (2001): 359-370.
  25. Yew SC and Chan K. “A retrospective study of endodontically treated mandibular first molars in a Chinese population”. Journal of Endodontics 19 (1993): 471-473.
  26. Ferraz JA and Pecora JD. “Three rooted mandibular molars in patients of Mongolian, Caucasian and Negro origin”. Brazilian Dental Journal 3 (1992): 113-117.
  27. Loh HS. “Incidence and features of three-rooted permanent mandibular molars”. Australian Dental Journal 35 (1990): 437-437.
  28. Jones AW. “The incidence of the three-rooted lower first permanent molar in Malay people”. Singapore Dental Journal 5 (1980): 15-17.
  29. Hochstetter RL. “Incidence of trifurcated mandibular first permanent molars in the population of Guam”. Journal of Dental Research 54 (1975): 1097.
  30. Laband F. “Two years dental school work in British North Borneo: Relation of diet to dental caries among natives”. Journal of the American Dental Association 28 (1941): 992-998.
  31. Iwaka Y. “Three-dimensional observation of the pulp cavity of mandibular first molars by micro-CT”. Journal of Oral Biosciences 48 (2006): 94-102.
  32. Jung M., et al. “The imaging of root canal obturation using micro-CT”. International Endodontic Journal 38 (2005): 617-626. 
  33. Mannocci F., et al. “The isthmuses of the mesial root of mandibular molars: A microcomputed tomographic study”. International Endodontic Journal 38 (2005): 558-563.
  34. Tu MG., et al. “Detection of permanent three-rooted mandibular first molars by cone-beam computed tomography imaging in Taiwanese individuals”. Journal of Endodontics 35 (2009): 503-507.
  35. Matherne RP., et al. “Use of conebeam computed tomography to identify root canal systems in vitro”. Journal of Endodontics 34 (2008): 87-89.
  36. Taylor C., et al. “Endodontic applications of cone-beam volumetric tomography”. Journal of Endodontics 33 (2007): 1121-1132.
  37. Song JS., et al. “The prevalence and morphologic classification of distolingual roots in the mandibular molars in a Korean population”. Journal of Endodontics 36 (2010): 653- 657.
  38. Tu MG., et al. “Prevalence of three-rooted primary mandibular □rst molars in Taiwan”. Journal of the Formosan Medical Association 109 (2010): 69-74.
  39. Sujatha. I., et al. “Prevalence of three rooted mandibular permanent first molars in a south Indian population-Radiovisiographic Evaluation”. American Overseas School of Rome 2.1 (2012): 8-12.
  40. Turp JC and Alt KW. “Anatomy and morphology of human teeth. In: Alt KW, Rosing FW, Teschler-Nicola M, eds. Dental Anthropology. Fundamentals, Limits and Prospects”. Austria: Springer (1998): 71-94.
  41. Norman W., et al. “Birooted primary canines: report of three cases”. Pediatric Dentisry 18.4 (1996): 328-330.
  42. Trope M., et al. “Mandibular premolars with more than one root canal in different race groups”. Journal of Endodontics 12 (1986): 343-345.
  43. Cleghorn BM., et al. “The root and root canal morphology of the human mandibular first premolar: a literature review”. Journal of Endodontics 33 (2007): 509-516.
  44. Nganba K., et al. Case Series of Three Rooted Primary Mandibular First Molars and Their Management 6.9 (2017).
  45. De Moor RJG., et al. “The radix entomolaris in mandibular first molar: an endodontic challenge”. International Endodontic Journal 37 (2004): 789-799.
  46. Taylor AR. “Variations in the human tooth form as met with isolated teeth”. Journal Anatomy Physiology 33 (1899): 268-272.
  47. Campbell TD. “Dentition and the palate of the Australian Aboriginal”. Adelaide: Keith Sheridan Foundation, Adelaide Publication 2 (1925).
  48. Drennan MR. “The dentition of the Bushmen tribe”. Annals of South African Museum 24 (1929): 61-87.
  49. Shaw JC. “The teeth, the bony palate and the mandible in Bantu Races of South Africa”. London, UK: John Bale, Sons and Danielson (1931).
  50. Pedersen PO. “The East Greenland Eskimo dentition. Numerical variations and anatomy. A contribution to comparative ethnic odontography”. Copenhagen: Meddeleser om Gronland (1949): 14-144.
  51. Jorgensen KD. “The deciduous dentition. A descriptive and comparative anatomical study”. Acta Odontologica Scandinavica 14 (1956): 1-202.
  52. Skidmore AE and Bjorndahl AM. “Root canal morphology of the human mandibular first molar”. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology 32 (1971): 778-784.
  53. Turner CG. “Three-rooted mandibular first permanent molars and the question of American Indian origins”. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 34 (1971): 229-241.
  54. Curzon ME and Curzon AJ. “Three-rooted mandibular molars in the Keewatin Eskimo”. Journal of the Canadian Dental Association 37 (1971): 71-72.
  55. Curzon ME. “Three-rooted mandibular permanent molars in English Caucasians”. Journal of Dental Research 52 (1973): 181.
  56. Sugiyama K., et al. “A study on the three roots in the mandibular first deciduous molar”. The Japanese Journal of Pediatric Dentistry 14 (1976): 241-246.
  57. Walker RT and Quackenbush LE. “Three-root lower first permanent molar in Hong-Kong Chinese”. British Dental Journal 159 (1985): 298-299.
  58. Walker RT. “Root form and canal antomy of mandibular first molars in a southern Chinese population”. Dental Traumatology 4 (1988): 19-22.
  59. Harada Y., et al. “Frequency of three-rooted mandibular first molars. Survey of X-ray photographs”. Shika Kiso Igakkai Zasshi 31 (1989): 13-18.
  60. Younes SA., et al. “Three-rotoed permanent mandibular first molars of Asian and black groups in the Middle East”. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology 69 (1990): 102-105.
  61. Sperber GH and Moreau JL. “Study of the number of roots and canals in Senegalese first permanent mandibular molars”. International Endodontic Journal 31 (1998): 112-116.
  62. Song JS., et al. “Incidence and relationship of an additional root in the mandibular first permanent molar and primary molars”. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, and Oral Radiology 107 (2009): e56-e60.
  63. Schafer E., et al. “The prevalence of three-rooted mandibular permanent first molars in a German population”.  Journal of Endodontics 35 (2009): 202-205.
  64. Tu MG., et al. “Prevalence of three-rooted primary mandibular first molars in Taiwan”. Journal of the Formosan Medical Association 109 (2010): 69-74. 
  65. Garg AK., et al. “Prevalence of three-rooted mandibular permanent first molars among the Indian population”. Journal of Endodontics 36 (2010):1302-1306.
  66. Yang Y., et al. “Prevalence of 3-rooted first permanent molars among a Shanghai Chinese population”. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, and Oral Radiology 110 (2010): e98-e100.
  67. Peiris R., et al. “Root and canal morphology of permanent mandibular molars in Sri Lankan population”. Odontology 95 (2007): 16-23.
  68. Huang RY., et al. “Three-dimensional analysis of the root morphology of mandibular first molars with distolingual roots”. International Endodontic Journal 43 (2010): 478-484.
×

Citation

Citation: Tazdik G Chowdhury., et al. “Three Rooted Primary Mandibular First Molar - A Rare Case Report”.Acta Scientific Dental Sciences 4.2 (2020): 15-22.



Member In





News and Events


  • Certification for Review
    Acta Scientific certifies the Editors/reviewers for their review done towards the assigned articles of the respective journals.
  • Submission Timeline for Upcoming Issue
    The last date for submission of articles for regular Issues is November 10, 2020.
  • Publication Certificate
    Authors will be issued a "Publication Certificate" as a mark of appreciation for publishing their work.
  • Best Article of the Issue
    The Editors will elect one Best Article after each issue release. The authors of this article will be provided with a certificate of “Best Article of the Issue”.
  • Welcoming Article Submission
    Acta Scientific delightfully welcomes active researchers for submission of articles towards the upcoming issue of respective journals.
  • Contact US