Acta Scientific Ophthalmology (ISSN: 2582-3191)

Research Article Volume 5 Issue 6

Validation of a New Meibomian Gland Dysfunction (MGD) Grading Scale for Rapid Assessment of MGD in Clinical Practice

Fahad Salem Alshahrani*1, Fiona Stapleton2, Blanka Golebiowski3, Emma Gibson4 and Archana Boga3

1Department of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, UNSW, Australia
2Scientia Professor, School of Optometry and Vision Science, UNSW Sydney, Australia
3School of Optometry and Vision Science, UNSW Sydney, Australia
4Adjunct Lecturer at the UNSW School of Optometry and Vision Science , Australia

*Corresponding Author: Fahad Salem Alshahrani, Department of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, UNSW, Australia.

Received: April 20, 2022; Published: May 16, 2022

Abstract

Meibomian gland dysfunction is an abnormality of meibomian glands and their secretions, resulting in poor quality of tears.

Purpose: To validate the MGD grading combination of telangiectasia plus expressibility against the MGD14 questionnaire and against meibography (measured using the Oculus Keratograph). In addition, the sub-aims of this study are to validate the MGD14 questionnaire against meibography and against OSDI questionnaire.

Methods: Study design is an observational, cross-sectional, single visit study. Twenty participants were enrolled into this study, including non-contact lens wearers (14 males and 6 females; mean age ± SD, 30.8 ± 3.5 years). Ocular comfort symptoms were examined using MGD14 and OSDI questionnaires. Telangiectasia, expressibility, meibography and Marx line were each graded from 0 to 3, pouting, orifice plugging and irregular lid margins were scored as present or absent while the number of capped glands and the number of expressible glands were counted.

Results: There was no significant correlation between MGD14 score and TE combination, (Spearman’s correlation r = 0.37; p > 0.05). Meibography scores didn’t show correlation with TE combination (Spearman’s correlation r = 0.17; p > 0.05). In addition, the results showed that there was no association between meibography and MGD14 score (Spearman’s correlation r = 0.21; p > 0.05). A strong positive correlation was found between MGD14 scores and OSDI scores (Pearson correlation r = 0.68; p < 0.05).

Conclusion: This is the first study to validate the combination of TE for evaluating MGD. This study didn’t show correlations between TE combination against MGD14 and against meibography. In addition, there was no correlation between meibography and MGD14. Overall, this study displayed poor relationship between symptoms and signs of dry eye, however, these results need to be confirmed in a large sample size with more participants displaying MGD.

Keywords: Meibomian Gland Dysfunction; Abnormality; Meibography

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Citation

Citation: Fahad Salem Alshahrani., et al. “Validation of a New Meibomian Gland Dysfunction (MGD) Grading Scale for Rapid Assessment of MGD in Clinical Practice".Acta Scientific Ophthalmology 5.6 (2022): 46-52.

Copyright

Copyright: © 2022 Fahad Salem Alshahrani., et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.




Metrics

Acceptance rate35%
Acceptance to publication20-30 days
ISI- IF1.042
JCR- IF0.24

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