Acta Scientific Neurology (ISSN: 2582-1121)

Short Communication Volume 3 Issue 1

Work Stress in Doctors

Rateesh Sareen*

Assistant Consultant, Department of Pathology, Santokba Durlabhji Memorial Hospital and Research Center, Rajasthan, India

*Corresponding Author: Rateesh Sareen, Assistant Consultant, Department of Pathology, Santokba Durlabhji Memorial Hospital and Research Center, Rajasthan, India.

Received: December 03, 2019; Published: December 13, 2019

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  The 21st century is the century of stress with ever-growing demand, fierce competition, globalization and ever increasing demand to deliver more and more, has given rise to new phrase’ work place stress’ [1]. It’s a paradox indeed that where we all strive for livelihood, pick up jobs to full fill our basic needs and work relentlessly for the fulfillment of our aspirations, work places that promise as life lines become source of stress. The work place stress syndrome is ubiquitous phenomena spanning all professions and various professionals from blue collared manual working staff to the professionals in white collar job and in white dress- health care professionals. Stress has become a part and parcel of everyday life and each one of us a victim [2].

  The word stress originates from the Latin word ‘stringere’ that means starvation, sting, pain and physical hardship or suffering. It was first referred to by Selye Hans [3] in 1936 and referred to the non specific response of the body to any demand placed upon it. Further it was defined as an external event or internal driver which threatens to upset the equilibrium of the organism. When the individual is confronted with an opportunity to what he or she desires and for which the outcome is uncertain and especially where the resources with the individual are not adequate, the environment and psychological pressure results in stress [4,5].

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Citation

Citation: Rateesh Sareen. “Work Stress in Doctors”.Acta Scientific Neurology 3.1 (2020): 22-24.



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