Acta Scientific Medical Sciences (ISSN: 2582-0931)

Research Article Volume 4 Issue 2

Relation of Circulating Adiponectin Level with Epicardial Adipose Tissue Thickness Among Overweight and Obese Indian Patients: A Cross Sectional Study

Ananda Mohan Chakraborty1, Tanushree Mondal2*, Debashish Mondal3 and Soumitra Ghosh4

1Senior Resident of Internal Medicine, IPGMER, Kolkata, West Bengal
2Associate Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Medical College, Kolkata and ADME, Government of West Bengal
3Senior Resident of Nandigram Super Speciality Hospital, East-Midnapore, West Bengal
4Professor and Head of The Department, Internal Medicine, IPGMER, Kolkata, West Bengal

*Corresponding Author: Tanushree Mondal, Associate Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Medical College, Kolkata and ADME, Government of West Bengal.

Received: January 06, 2020; Published: January 20, 2020

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Abstract

Background: Obesity is associated with various cardiometabolic disorders. Recent studies have explored that ectopic fat is pathologically more ominous than Eutopic fat. Excess Epicardial Adipose tissue (EAT) is considered as ectopic fat which is defined as deposition of triglycerides within cells of non-adipose tissue that normally contain only small amounts of fat. Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) which is now considered as endocrine organ, is a potential source of bioactive molecules. Bioactive molecules thus synthesised and secreted are responsible for adverse consequences over myocardium by autocrine and paracrine loop. Circulating Adiponectin has an anti-inflammatory and anti-obesogenic property. Adiponectin reduces as obesity and insulin resistance increases. The purpose of this study was [1] to assess the circulating Adiponectin level among obese and overweight patients and [2] to assess possible relation between Adiponectin level and EAT.

Methods: : It was a cross-sectional observational study involving adults more than 18 years (n = 74) present with overweight (BMI ≥ 23 Kg/M2) and obesity (BMI ≥ 25 Kg/M2) in Obesity and lifestyle diseases clinic of IPGME and R, Kolkata. Acutely ill patients, pregnant patients, advanced hepatic and renal disease patients and patient having history of acute coronary syndrome were excluded from the study. EAT assessment was done by trans thoracic echocardiography, Adiponectin assessment was done by Adipogen mouse kit (ACRP 30; Adipo Q).

Results: Mean Adiponectin value was 0.71 ng/ml (SD 0.70) among the study group. Mean epicardial Adipose tissue thickness was 6.11 mm (SD 1.830). There was a strong negative correlation exists between Adiponectin level and EAT (R: -0.5696; p < 0.05). Adiponectin was inversely correlated with EAT in this study, as EAT increases level of circulating adiponectin reduces. Among the traditional anthropometric variables only Waist Hip ration and Percent body fat was significantly correlated with EAT.

Conclusion: Adiponectin is an anti-obesogenic molecule secreted from Adipose tissue and regulate body fat deposition and inflammation. A strong inverse correlation has been shown between circulating Adiponectin level and EAT in this study. Low adiponectin is detrimental as per ectopic adiposity in the form of EAT is concern.

Keywords: Adiponectin; Epicardial Adipose Tissue; Obesity

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Citation

Citation: Tanushree Mondal., et al. “Relation of Circulating Adiponectin Level with Epicardial Adipose Tissue Thickness Among Overweight and Obese Indian Patients: A Cross Sectional Study". Acta Scientific Medical Sciences 4.2 (2020): 01-04.



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